Upcoming Events

Mar 4
From Digital to Dungeons: Female Gamers and Dungeons and Dragons’ Inclusive Play6:00 p.m.

University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication professor Amanda Cote gives a free Quack Chats pub talk. Food and drinks available for purchase at The Ax Billy.
March 4 6:00 p.m.
Downtown Athletic Club, The Ax Billy

University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication professor Amanda Cote gives a free Quack Chats pub talk.

Food and drinks available for purchase at The Ax Billy.

Mar 5
"On Rising Together: Creative and Collective Responses to the Climate Crisis"7:30 p.m.

With each record-breaking storm or flood it becomes clearer that climate change and rising seas are transforming the coastline of the United States. Writer Elizabeth Rush...
March 5 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

With each record-breaking storm or flood it becomes clearer that climate change and rising seas are transforming the coastline of the United States. Writer Elizabeth Rush travelled from vanishing shorelines in New England to inundated bayous in Louisiana to chronicle the impact of sea level rise on vulnerable communities and ecosystems. She employed a literary approach for her recent book Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore, a finalist for the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction. “I believe that language can lessen the distance between humans and the world of which we are a part; I believe that it can foster interspecies intimacy and, as a result, care.” 

Elizabeth Rush, the Oregon Humanities Center's 2019–20 Robert D. Clark Lecturer, will give a talk, “On Rising Together: Creative and Collective Responses to the Climate Crisis,” on Thursday, March 5, 2020 at 7:30 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, 1376 Olive St. in Eugene. 

What might we learn from the people living on climate change’s front lines about the future that we share? In her talk, Rush will speak about a small community on the eastern shore of Staten Island––a place that hurricane Sandy both undid and remade from the ground up––investigating the storm’s aftermath and the radical decisions residents made about how to overcome their shared vulnerability. She will give voice to those who have traditionally been left out of environmental discourse and how we might make the conversation more whole moving forward. 

Elizabeth Rush is the author of Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore and Still Lifes from a Vanishing City: Essays and Photographs from Yangon, Myanmar. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Gaurdian, Harper’s, The Atlantic, Pacific Standard, and the New Republic, among others. She is the recipient of fellowships and grants including the Howard Foundation Fellowship, awarded by Brown University; the Society for Environmental Journalism Grant; the Metcalf Institute Climate Change Adaptation Fellowship; and the Science in Society Award from the National Association of Science Writers. She received her MFA in nonfiction from Southern New Hampshire University, and teaches creative nonfiction at Brown University. 

Mar 10
Russian hackers, trolls and #DemocracyRIP7:00 p.m.

Donald Trump's 2016 victory in the Electoral College could not have occurred without 78,000 voters in three states. But were these voters affected by the Russian trolls and...
March 10 7:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 175

Donald Trump's 2016 victory in the Electoral College could not have occurred without 78,000 voters in three states. But were these voters affected by the Russian trolls and hackers? Trump denies it, as does Russian President Vladimir Putin, and many argue that we can never know. Drawing on earlier path-breaking work, Kathleen Hall Jamieson will argue that it’s likely the Russians did help to elect the 45th president of the United States, based on her research on unique polling data, analyses of how the press used hacked content, and synthesis of half a century of media-effects research.

 

Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson, National Academy of Sciences 2020 Public Welfare Award winner and co-founder of FactCheck.org, is a professor in the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania and director of its Annenberg Public Policy Center. She has authored or co-authored 16 books, including Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President, which won the 2019 R. R. Hawkins Award from the Association of American Publishers. Her paper “Implications of the Demise of ‘Fact’ in Political Discourse” received the American Philosophical Society’s 2016 Henry Allen Moe Prize. Jamieson is a co-founder of FactCheck.org and its subsidiary site, SciCheck, which monitors political speech for the misuse of science. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and the International Communication Association. 


This talk is co-sponsored Center for Science Communication Research (SCR, formerly Media Center for Science and Technology) and the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics (WMC). The SCR, housed within the School of Journalism and Communication, works to advance research in science communication to connect science and society and facilitate research-based decision making. The WMC, part of the School of Law, encourages civic engagement and inspires enlightened dialogue by bringing students, scholars, activists, policymakers, and communities together to discuss issues affecting Oregon, our nation, and the world.

This talk was made possible by the Richard W. and Laurie Johnston Lecture Fund.

Mar 11
Communicating the Trustworthiness of Science with Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson5:00 p.m.

Refreshments will be served at 5 p.m. Talk begins at 5:30 p.m. The number of people who distrust scientists increased by over 50 percent between 2013 and 2017, according...
March 11 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Redwood Auditorium

Refreshments will be served at 5 p.m.
Talk begins at 5:30 p.m.

The number of people who distrust scientists increased by over 50 percent between 2013 and 2017, according to a YouGov survey. What’s behind this decline in public trust, and what can be done to restore it?

Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson, National Academy of Sciences 2020 Public Welfare Award winner and co-founder of FactCheck.org, is visiting campus March 11 to deliver the annual Richard W. and Laurie Johnston Lecture. During the free public talk and audience Q&A, she will:


Examine the factors that influence the public’s perception of the trustworthiness of science
Present examples of various media narratives
Discuss ways to decrease the polarization of scientific findings


 

Jamieson is a professor in the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania and director of its Annenberg Public Policy Center. She has authored or co-authored 16 books, including Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President, which won the 2019 R. R. Hawkins Award from the Association of American Publishers. Her paper “Implications of the Demise of ‘Fact’ in Political Discourse” received the American Philosophical Society’s 2016 Henry Allen Moe Prize. Jamieson is a co-founder of FactCheck.org and its subsidiary site, SciCheck, which monitors political speech for the misuse of science. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and the International Communication Association. 

 

Sponsored by the Center for Science and Communication Research (formerly Media Center for Science and Technology) and co-sponsored by the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact and Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, this lecture is part of the School of Journalism and Communication’s annual Robert W. and Laurie Johnston Lecture series. This series brings professionals to the SOJC for thought-provoking lectures, workshops, and discussions about the thorny issues today’s journalists face, and is made possible by generous gifts from the Johnston family, George E. Jones of U.S. News and World Report, and the Correspondents Fund.

Mar 16
Suicide Prevention Training and Resources9:00 a.m.

The Suicide Prevention Team and the University Counseling Center (UCC) offers this workshop for faculty, staff, and GEs. Partcipant learning objectives are to: Increase skills...
March 16 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.
Straub Hall, 251

The Suicide Prevention Team and the University Counseling Center (UCC) offers this workshop for faculty, staff, and GEs. Partcipant learning objectives are to:

Increase skills in identifying and responding to students who may have thoughts of suicide. Increase comfort to engage with a student in a conversation about your concern and ways to seek help. Refresh knowledge of campus and community resources and how to make an appropriate referral.

If a department would like to schedule a suicide prevention workshop, please submit a request form here. 

The Student Suicide Prevention Team also offers a peer-to-peer workshop for students. Request a student workshop here. 

If you are thinking about suicide, call the UCC After-Hours Support and Crisis Line at 541-346-3227 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255) now. Or text 'OREGON' to 741-741.

Mar 19
Public Screening: Storytelling with Communities class6:00 p.m.

The Winter 2020 multimedia journalism class, Storytelling with Communities, invites the public to a screening of the students' current projects.
March 19 6:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
George S. Turnbull Center, Shirley Pape Forum

The Winter 2020 multimedia journalism class, Storytelling with Communities, invites the public to a screening of the students' current projects.

Apr 1
Ideas on Tap: The Truth About Dishonesty6:00 p.m.

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. This month, join David...
April 1 6:00 p.m.
Viking Braggot Co. Southtowne

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. This month, join David Markowitz, assistant professor in the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication, for The Truth About Dishonesty, a discussion of how deception plays a fundamental role in our lives—from how we date to how we use language, and why detecting deception is such a challenge. 

Admission is free and food and beverages are available for purchase. Learn more at mnch.uoregon.edu/learn/ideas-on-tap.

Apr 10
Nikole Hannah-Jones: "1619 and the Legacy That Built a Nation"6:00 p.m.

***This event is FREE, but registration is required. ***   As the lead writer for New York Times Magazine’s “The 1619 Project,” a major...
April 10 6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Straub Hall, 156

***This event is FREE, but registration is required. ***

 

As the lead writer for New York Times Magazine’s “The 1619 Project,” a major viral multimedia initiative observing the 400th anniversary of the first African slaves arriving in America, award-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones explores the lasting legacy of black enslavement on the nation—specifically, how black Americans pushed for the democracy we have today. 

Nothing we know about American life today has been untouched by slavery. Everything, from social infrastructure and segregation to music and sugar, has been shaped by it. “The 1619 Project” features all black American authors, activists, journalists, and more, spreading its heartbreaking and absolutely essential message worldwide.

In her talk, Hannah-Jones will explore how, despite our progress, we must remain vigilant in the vital fight against racial inequality, and how it is ethically imperative to reassess longstanding narratives if we want to get closer to the truth and move forward into a better future, together. 

 

About Nikole Hannah-Jones

Nikole Hannah-Jones is a MacArthur Genius, winner of the National Book Award, and a New York Times Magazine staff writer. She has also received a Peabody Award, a George Polk Award for radio reporting, and the National Magazine Award for journalism that illuminates issues of national importance. She was named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists and received the Fred M. Hechinger Grand Prize for Distinguished Education Reporting as well as the Emerson College President’s Award for Civic Leadership. Hannah-Jones also co-founded the Ida B. Wells Society for Investigative Reporting. Her brilliant, heavy-hitting journalism has also been featured in The Atlantic Magazine, Huffington Post, Essence Magazine, Politico Magazine, and on This American Life, NPR, MSNBC, and many other news programs and outlets across the country and internationally.

 

About the Event

This event, part of the Ancil Payne Week of Journalism Ethics, is made possible by the Robert and Mabel Ruhl Endowment and is co-sponsored by the University of Oregon’s Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Division of Equity and Inclusion, and the Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center. The annual UO School of Journalism and Communication Ruhl Lecture brings the most influential voices in mass communication to campus.

Apr 16
Spring Career Fairnoon

This is the last chance of the year to connect with over 80 companies and organizations that will be here in search of talented UO students and alumni!  Polish up your resume...
April 16 noon–4:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Ballroom

This is the last chance of the year to connect with over 80 companies and organizations that will be here in search of talented UO students and alumni!  Polish up your resume and join us in the EMU Ballroom between noon and 4:00 p.m.!

Apr 16
Spring Career Fairnoon

This is the last chance of the year to connect with over 80 companies and organizations who will be here in search of talented UO students and alumni!  Polish up your resume...
April 16 noon–4:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), EMU Ballroom

This is the last chance of the year to connect with over 80 companies and organizations who will be here in search of talented UO students and alumni!  Polish up your resume and join us in the EMU Ballroom on Thursday, April 16th between noon and 4:00pm!
 

Apr 17
SOJC Ad Team Competition9:00 a.m.

American Advertising Federation's District 11 Competition will hosted at the Embassy Suites in Downtown Portland. Seven schools from the region will compete to see who makes...
April 17 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Embassy Suites

American Advertising Federation's District 11 Competition will hosted at the Embassy Suites in Downtown Portland. Seven schools from the region will compete to see who makes it to the national competition in Palm Springs, CA. For more information, please visit:

https://www.aaf.org/AAFMemberR/AWARDS_AND_EVENTS/Events___Programs/National_Student_Advertising_Competition/AAFMemberR/Awards_and_Events/Programs_Events/NSAC.aspx?hkey=ed45f531-c449-449d-9e12-2fadb3d1c89f

Apr 21
“Elastic: Flexible Thinking for our Time of Change”7:30 p.m.

Leonard Mlodinow explores how the human mind handles change We live in a time of great turmoil and change in personal, social, and business spheres. To thrive in such a time,...
April 21 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

Leonard Mlodinow explores how the human mind handles change

We live in a time of great turmoil and change in personal, social, and business spheres. To thrive in such a time, we must adapt and exercise a particular kind of thinking. Elastic thinking is needed to assess new situations, and to form a framework for understanding and reacting to them. It is leads to innovation and creativity. 

In his upcoming talk, “Elastic: Flexible Thinking for our Time of Change,” Leonard Mlodinow will explore the psychology and neuroscience behind elastic thinking, detail ways to evaluate our ability to think nimbly, and provide methods to help us improve our skills.

Leonard Mlodinow, theoretical physicist and best-selling literary science writer, will give the Oregon Humanities Center’s 2019–20 Kritikos Lecture. 

Mlodinow’s lecture is based on his recent book Elastic: Flexible Thinking in a Constantly Changing World, an exploration of how elastic thinking works. He draws on cutting-edge neuroscience to show how, millennia ago, our brains developed an affinity for novelty, idea generation, and exploration. He discovers how flexible thinking enabled some of the greatest artists, writers, musicians, and innovators to create paradigm shifts. And he investigates the organizations that have demonstrated an elastic ability to adapt to new technologies.

Mlodinow’s parents were holocaust survivors. His father, Simon, was a leader in the Jewish underground in Czestochowa, Poland, until he was shipped to Buchenwald concentration camp in 1944. The Nazis slaughtered his wife and two young children. After he was liberated in 1945, Simon immigrated to New York City and met Mlodinow’s mother, Irene, who had also been in a labor camp in Poland. They raised Mlodinow and his two siblings in Chicago.

Mlodinow dropped out of Brandeis University in 1973 when the Yom Kippur War began and traveled to Israel to work on a kibbutz. While there he discovered physics after reading Richard Feynman’s books. He later completed his studies at Brandeis and earned his PhD in theoretical physics from UC Berkeley.

In addition to Elastic, Mlodinow has authored and co-authored many NYT bestsellers: Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior, War of the Worldviews (with Deepak Chopra), The Grand Design (with Stephen Hawking), The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives, and A Briefer History of Time (with Stephen Hawking).

Mlodinow’s talk is free and open to the public. For disability accommodations (which must be requested by April 14), contact ohc@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3934.

Apr 22
UO Graduate School Fair 11:00 a.m.

What’s the next step in your path post-graduation? Find intriguing options at the UO Graduate School Fair Wednesday, April 22nd. We’ll be in the EMU Ballroom from 11...
April 22 11:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), EMU Gumwood

What’s the next step in your path post-graduation? Find intriguing options at the UO Graduate School Fair Wednesday, April 22nd. We’ll be in the EMU Ballroom from 11 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.  Don’t miss this!
 

Apr 23
DWP2020: Ethical Design in Immersive Media5:30 p.m.

As the power of augmented, virtual, and extended realities and the Spacial Web continues to grow, industry and the academy are also beginning to grapple with the ethical...
April 23 5:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
White Stag Block, Main Event Room

As the power of augmented, virtual, and extended realities and the Spacial Web continues to grow, industry and the academy are also beginning to grapple with the ethical considerations that accompany that power. How often do the individuals who design these immersive experiences consider the potential consequences of both brief and prolonged use in these spaces? The extraordinary opportunity to both elevate and destroy rests in the hands of the content and experience creator. This panel brings together academics, journalists and industry professionals at the forefront of this field to discuss what we know and what we don’t know about the ethical considerations of immersive media.

Presenters: 


Kent Bye, Journalist, Historian, Philosopher and host of Voices of VR Podcast
Daniel Pimentel, Lab Coordinator, Media Effects & Technology Lab and in Fall 2020, UO Assistant Professor in Immersive Media Psychology
TBA


Moderator: Donna Davis, Associate Professor and Director of the Master's in Strategic Communications program

RSVP required via Design Week Portland 2020

Apr 30
What is Information? 5:00 p.m.

What is Information? (2020) will investigate conceptualizations and implementations of information via material, representational, and hybrid frames. The conference-experience...
April 30–May 2
White Stag Block

What is Information? (2020) will investigate conceptualizations and implementations of information via material, representational, and hybrid frames. The conference-experience will consider information and its transformational æffects—from documents to data; from facts and fictions to pattern recognition; from physical information to differential equations; and from volatility, uncertainty, and ambiguity to collective intelligence and wisdom. 

The tenth annual What is…? examines tapestries, temperaments, and topologies of information lenses and practices—including—social and technical, mathematical and semantic, physical and biological, economic and political, cultural and environmental information. Thus, information can be understood as physical, for instruction, and about epistemic systems. Next year’s gathering expands on What is Technology? (2019), which explored technology as tools, processes, and moral knowledge, as well as problem-solving and intelligent inquiry.

Plenary participants to be announced.

May 1
Grand Opening of the SOJC Experience Hub3:00 p.m.

You’re invited to the grand opening of the UO School of Journalism and Communication’s new Experience Hub, located on the first floor of Allen Hall.  Part...
May 1 3:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Allen Hall, First Floor

You’re invited to the grand opening of the UO School of Journalism and Communication’s new Experience Hub, located on the first floor of Allen Hall. 

Part production studio, part research center, and part hands-on learning lab—the Allen Hall Experience Hub is a place where students and faculty collaborate to develop innovative content and examine the media from every angle.

Join us for a ribbon-cutting ceremony, refreshments, and demonstrations in the Experience Hub’s newly renovated collaboration spaces:


Immersive Media Lab 
Social Media Analytics Lab
Production Studio and Editing Bay 
Podcast Studio 
Equipment Checkout
Writing Central and collaboration space 
Center of Science Communication Research 
Student and Career Services 
Hall of Achievement interactive digital display 

May 21
10th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium9:00 a.m.

The Tenth Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium will be held on Thursday, May 21, 2020. The University of Oregon defines undergraduate research broadly and includes...
May 21 9:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Ballroom

The Tenth Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium will be held on Thursday, May 21, 2020.

The University of Oregon defines undergraduate research broadly and includes students from all disciplines. Undergraduate students all over campus are engaged in original projects, mentored research, creative work, entrepreneurial presentations, consulting pitches, portfolios, and community-based projects. UO students have big questions and are working on finding and making answers.

Whether you are presenting, attending, mentoring, or supporting your peers, we look forward to seeing you at the symposium.

Last year over 75 majors, 21 minors, and eight colleges were represented by students from every undergraduate class in the Erb Memorial Union and Science Library Visualization Lab for a day of oral and poster presentations, performance art, Academic Residential Community presentations and quick chats telling the stories behind the data students are gathering and working with. This year will welcome new presenters and mentors for the biggest symposium yet.

 

Jun 14
School of Journalism & Communication Commencement Ceremonynoon

Sunday, June 14, 2020 12:00-2:30 p.m. Matthew Knight Arena Tickets not required GRADUATES! Make sure you register for the ceremony on Marching Order. A link will be sent to...
June 14 noon–2:30 p.m.
Matthew Knight Arena

Sunday, June 14, 2020
12:00-2:30 p.m.
Matthew Knight Arena
Tickets not required

GRADUATES! Make sure you register for the ceremony on Marching Order. A link will be sent to your email address in May.  You can find more information on the SOJC Commencement website, here: https://journalism.uoregon.edu/commencement/

Students need to check-in at Matt Knight Arena between 11-11:30 a.m. Students will begin being seated by 11:40 a.m.

The ceremony will start promptly at 12:00 p.m.

REGALIA (cap and gown, etc.): Purchase at the Duck Store starting late March/early April. (http://www.uoduckstore.com/graduation-packages)

Visiting friends and family are encouraged to make travel arrangements early.

More details are coming soon. If you or someone you know needs special accommodations to enjoy the event, please contact sojcevents@uoregon.edu

Jun 14
School of Journalism and Communicationnoon

June 14 noon
Matthew Knight Arena
Jun 22
Immersive Communication Workshop12:00 a.m.

The Next Media Frontier is Immersive We are now living in the experiential age. Communicators must learn how to use immersive media to create experiences that tell compeling...
June 22–26
White Stag Block, Oregon Reality Lab (Room 405)

The Next Media Frontier is Immersive

We are now living in the experiential age. Communicators must learn how to use immersive media to create experiences that tell compeling stories, engage and educate audiences, elevate brands, and drive social change.

This summer, immerse yourself in a new kind of learning adventure: The Immersive Communication Workshop at the Oregon Reality (OR) Lab at the University of Oregon in downtown Portland. This week-long interdisciplinary workshop, taught by award-winning faculty at the OR Lab, will teach you how to:


Anticipate your clients' evolving communication needs
Use Immserive media technologies for experiential communication
Understand and improve immersive user experiences
Begin building virtual environments (no prior experience needed)
Understand the power and responsiblity of designing immersive content for ethical impact


A few spots are still available! Register today

 

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