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Program

Conference Program

Program Grid

Thursday, March 1

5:30-6:45 Communication and Society Annual Lecture: “Digital Depression: The Crisis of Digital Capitalism”
6:45 Opening Conference Reception

Friday, March 2

9:00-10:15 Plenary Panel #1: Television Today
10:30-11:45 #1 The Perfect Couple: Sports and Television #2 Changing Television, Changing News
11:45-1:00 Lunch
1:00-2:15 #3 Is it the Box or Is It Me? Audience/Content Interaction #4 Post-Network Television: To Regulate or Not to Regulate
2:30-3:45 #5 TV Advertising: New Directions or the Same Old Game #6 Public Broadcasting: Inspiring Civic Engagement In the Vast Wasteland
4:00-5:15 #7 Reaching the Market: Distribution in the Digital Age, Part 1 #8 Inside the Box: Explorations of Television Content
5:30-6:45 Plenary Panel #2: Legacies from the Past: The History of Television

Saturday, March 3

9:00-10:15 Special Session: Producing for Television: Changes and Challenges
10:30-11:45 #9 Retrieving Television’s Past #10 Understanding Reality TV #11 The Political Economy of Television
11:45-1:00 Lunch – Screenings and Sandwiches
1:00-2:15 #12 Television Outside of the Living Room: Memory, Nostalgia, and Museums #13 Issues in Globalization and Television #14 Tinkering with the Tube: Television and Technologies
2:30-3:45 #15 What’s in an Audience? Audience Labor and Television #16 Reaching the Market: Distribution in the Digital Age, Part 2 #17 It’s a TV World, After All?: Television, Communities, and Nations
4:00-5:15 #18 Premium TV: Texts and Audiences #19 Divergent/Convergent TV Space: Television and Other Industries #20 21st Century Television
5:30-6:45 PLENARY #3: The Future of Television
6:45 Closing Reception

 

THURSDAY, MARCH 1

5:30pm

COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY ANNUAL LECTURE

 

“Digital Depression: The Crisis of Digital Capitalism”

Dan Schiller, Professor of Communication and of Library & Information Science, University of Illinois

Followed by OPENING CONFERENCE RECEPTION (around 6:45pm)

Featuring an Exhibition and Celebration of Neon Nevada by Sheila Swan and Peter Laufer

 

FRIDAY, MARCH 2

9-10:15am                 

PLENARY PANEL #1

Television Today

Room 142/144

Moderator: Al Stavitsky, University of Oregon, USA

  • Phil Oppenheim, Senior VP, Programming and Scheduling, Turner Broadcasting
  • Graeme Turner, University of Queensland, Australia
  • Bryce Zabel, Stellar Productions/former President of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences

 

10:30-11:45am                 

Panel #1: The Perfect Couple: Sports and Television

Room 142/144

Moderator: Jacob Dittmer, University of Oregon, USA

 

Michael Real, Royal Roads University, Canada 

Theorizing the Sports-Television Dream Marriage: Why Sports Fit Television So Well

 

John Shrader, California State University, Long Beach, USA

Live Television Sports: Surviving and Thriving in the New Media Landscape

 

Bill Kunz, University of Washington, Tacoma

The Price is Wrong: Sports Networks in the 21st Century

 

Joe Becker, KGW Sports Anchor/Reporter

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Panel #2: Changing Television, Changing News

Room 150

Moderator: Peter Lauder, University of Oregon, USA

 

Joy Chavez Mapaye, University of Alaska, Kathleen M. Ryan, University of Colorado Boulder, Jenny Dean, University of Oregon, Noah Springer, University of Colorado Boulder, USA

Digital Flow: New Approaches to TV News Research in the Digital Age

 

Chantal Francoeur, l’Universite du Quebec à Montreal, Canada

Convergence Makes Television the Primary Data Collector in Radio-Web-TV Newsrooms

 

Carey L. Higgins and Gerald Sussman, Portland State University, USA

Impacts of Conglomeration and New Technology on the Local TV Newsroom

 

Joe Atkinson, University of Auckland, New Zealand

The Equivocal Politics of Fake News: Dialogue and The Daily Show

 

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11:45am-1pm  LUNCH

on your own, see list of suggestions in registration material

 

1-2:15pm 

 

Panel #3: Is it the Box or Is it Me? Audience/Content Interaction

Room 142/144

Moderator: Lauren Bratslavsky, University of Oregon, USA

 

Brian Gillespie, Darrin Taylor, Mark Mulder, Manja Zidansek, Washington State University, USA

The Interactive Role of Narrative Transportation and Program Familiarity in Television Programming Consumption

 

Caitlin Ring, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA

Watching Your Way to Weight Loss: The Impact of The Biggest Loser Viewership on Perceived Self-Efficacy

 

Natasha Patterson, Simon Fraser University, Canada

Exploring Women’s Participation in Canadian Reality TV Competition Shows

 

Charlotte Howell, Georgia State University, USA

The Cultural Forum Writ Literal: Engagement with Religion in Online Telefantasy Forums

 

Filiz Aydogan Boschele, University of Marmara, Turkey

TurkeyTV’s Wedding Programs and the Changing Cultural Construction of Turkey

 

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Panel #4: Post-Network Television: To Regulate or Not to Regulate

Room 150

Moderator: Al Stavitsky, University of Oregon, USA


Caryn Murphy, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, USA

Showing a Little Skins: Content Regulation in the Post-Network Era

 

Jason Zenor, SUNY-Oswego, USA

The S**t has Hit the Fan: The State of FCC’s Indecency Policies in the New Media World Order

 

David C. Olson, Director, Office of Communication Technology, City of Portland: Mt. Hood Cable Regulatory Commission (MHCRC)

back to grid

 

2:30-3:45pm

 

Panel #5: TV Advertising: New Directions or the Same Old Game

Room 142/144

Moderator: Priscilla Peña Ovalle, University of Oregon, USA

 

Cynthia B. Meyers, College of Saint Vincent, USA

Changing Industry Views of Audience Toleration of Commercials: Hulu v. Netflix

 

Gennadiy Chernov, University of Regina, Canada, and David Koranda, University of Oregon, USA

Consumer Perception Of Advertising Content Within The Context Of Local Television News.

 

Allison Nettnin, Allegheny College, USA

Gleeking Out: New Directions in Television Branding

 

Harsha Gangadharbatla, University of Oregon, USA,  Kelty Logan, University of Colorado, USA, and Laura Bright, Texas Christian University, USA

Just How Valuable is Television Advertising compared to Advertising on Social Media in the Minds of Consumers?

 

Darcey West Morris, Georgia State University, USA

Why “Addressable” Means You’re Too Accessible: The Future of Television Advertising

 

back to grid

 

Panel #6: Public Broadcasting: Inspiring Civic Engagement In the Vast Wasteland

Room 150

Moderator: Michael Hunstberger, Linfield College, USA

 

Ed Madison, University of Oregon

Tweens & Cable Access to Power: Inspiring Civic Engagement in Elementary-age Students Through TV Production

 

Hun Shik Kim, University of Colorado, Boulder

Can Publicly Funded Broadcast Media Save Failing Journalism?

 

Golam Rahman, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh

Soul-searching of Public Service Broadcasting on Bangladesh Television

 

back to grid

 

4:00-5:15pm

 

Panel #7: Reaching the Market: Distribution in the Digital Age, Part 1

Room 142/144

Moderator: Dustin Morrow, Portland State University, USA

 

Hye Jin Lee, University of Iowa, USA, and Mark Andrejevic, University of Queensland, New Zealand

An Inconvenient Truth About App TV: Why “Anything, Anytime, Anywhere” Television Remains an Elusive Reality

 

Melanie E. S. Kohnen, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA

Everything New is Old Again: Normalizing the Production and Distribution of Web-Based Television

 

Matt Cohen, University of Iowa, USA

The Difficulty of Endorsing the “Television Anywhere, Anytime” Campaign: The Case of TimeWarner and the TWCableTV App

 

Michael E. Holmes, Ball State University, USA , Sheree Josephson, Weber State University, USA,  and Jacqueline Martinsen, Ball State University, USA

Second Screen TV Applications: Boon or Boondoggle?

back to grid

 

Panel #8: Inside the Box: Explorations of Television Content

Room 150

Moderator: Toby Miller, University of California, Riverside, USA

 

Nichole Bogarosh, Washington State University, USA

Where are All the Baby Boomers on Network Television?

 

Katrina Flener, Temple University, USA

The Commodity Form and Ideology:  Drug Discourses Across Varying Economic Models of Television

 

Melle Starsen, Upper Iowa University, USA

Cool to be Cruel: Mean Spiritedness of Modern Children’s TV Sitcoms

 

Paul Booth, DePaul University, USA

The Post-Network Social Network: Characters on Television in the 21st Century

 

back to grid

 

5:30-6:45pm

PLENARY PANEL #2

Legacies from the Past: The History of Television

Room 142/144

Moderator: Carol Stabile, University of Oregon, USA

  • Michele Hilmes, University of Wisconsin, USA
  • Horace Newcomb, University of Georgia, USA
  • Eileen Meehan, Southern Illinois University, USA

 

 

SATURDAY, MARCH 3

 

9-10:15am

SPECIAL SESSION: Producing for Television: Changes and Challenges

Room 142/144

Moderator: Vince Porter, Executive Producer, Governor’s Office of Film and Television, Portland, Oregon

  • Patric M. Verrone, writer, producer, and former President, Writers Guild-West
  • David Cress, Producer, Portlandia
  • Bill Oakley, writer, The Simpsons, Portlandia
  • Nathaniel Applefield, National Representative, Pacific Northwest, American Federation of Television and Radio Artists 

 

back to grid

10:30-11:45am

 

Panel #9: Retrieving Television’s Past

Room 142/144

Moderator: Michele Hilmes, University of Wisconsin, USA

 

Carol Stabile, University of Oregon, USA

Red Lassie: What American Television Might Have Been

 

Erin Copple Smith, Denison University, USA

Everything Old is New Again: Locating the Logics of Contemporary Product Placement in Broadcasting’s Past

 

Luke Stadel, Northwestern University, USA

HD/TV: Revising the Status of the Televisual Image, 1982-1993

 

Rod Stoneman, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

Early Channel 4 – Utopian Television?

back to grid

 

Panel #10:  Understanding Reality TV

Room 150

Moderator: Michael Aronson, University of Oregon, USA

 

Jack Bratich, Rutgers University, USA

From Tele-vision to Tele-programming: Reality, Affect, Subjectivation

 

Chelsea Bullock, University of Oregon, USA

Problematic Pleasures and Affective Moments: Theorizing Jersey Shore

 

Jon Crane, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, USA

The Alexis/Krystle Nexus: Gender Performance in Reality Television

 

Biswarup Sen, University of Oregon, USA

Reality Television and the Question of Global Form

 

back to grid

Panel #11: The Political Economy of Television

Room 350

Moderator: Ben Birkinbine, University of Oregon, USA

 

Micky Lee, Suffolk University, USA

Should Political Economists Study Financial Television?

 

Lee McGuigan, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Consumers: The Commodity Product of Interactive Television or Why Dallas Smythe’s Thesis is More Germane than Ever

 

Brice Nixon, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA

Critical Methods of Theorizing Television: Its Content as Mass Deception, Its Audience as a Commodity

 

Andre Sirois, University of Oregon, USA

“Your Record Has Been Scratched”: A Political Economic Analysis of Intellectual Property and Authenticity in the Case of BET’s Master of the Mix

back to grid

 

11:45am-1pm                  LUNCH

Screenings and Sandwiches, Room 142/144

Early Channel 4: Extracts of Programmes and Films

with Rod Stoneman, former Deputy Commissioning Editor in the Independent Film and Video Department at Channel 4 Television in the UK.

Illustrations and examples of programmes and films from the first ten years of Channel 4 television will be drawn from the following areas:

  • Ideas and intellectual debate
  • Radical political documentary
  • Access / community programme making
  • Experimental television
  • Personal / poetic short film-making
  • Creative programming on the arts

Extracts may include:

Soft and Hard – Jean-Luc Godard; Blue – Derek Jarman; Zanboko – Gaston Kaboré; Hush a Bye Baby – Margo Harkin; Lecture in Louvain – Jacques Lacan; Mother Ireland – Derry Workshop; The Work The Say is Mine – Rosie Gibson


 

1:00-2:15pm

 

Panel #12: Television Outside of the Living Room: Memory, Nostalgia, and Museums

Room 150

Moderator: Brant Burkey, University of Oregon, USA

 

Mabel Rosenheck, Northwestern University, USA

What Television Is, What Television Does: TV (as) History in American National Museums

 

Dale Moler, Central Michigan University, USA

Discourses about Television in a Transnational and Comparative Context, 1945-1955

 

Kate Newbold, Northwestern University, USA

Exhibiting Nostalgia: Personality, Authenticity, and “Living” History in Local Museums of Television

 

 

back to grid

Panel #13: Issues in Globalization and Television

Room 350

Moderator: Teddy Workneh, University of Oregon, USA

 

Abdur Razzaque Khan, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong and University of Chittagong, Bangladesh

Power and Politics of Private Television Channels’ Ownership in Bangladesh: A Critical Inquiry

 

André Dorcé and Rodrigo Gomez, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Mexico

Addressing Continuity and Change in Television Consumption and its Economic Model in Mexico

 

Harsha Gangadharbatla, University of Oregon, USA

Television, Globalization, and the Crisis of U.S. Cultural Imperialism

 

Michael Elavsky, Pennsylvania State University, USA

What American Idol Gives Back: The Commercial and Cultural Incentives to Global Charity

back to grid

 

Panel #14: Tinkering with the Tube: Television and Technologies

Room 142/144

Moderator: Ben Birkinbine, University of Oregon, USA

 

Raul Reis, Florida International University, USA

Digital Television in Latin America: Challenges and Possibilities

 

Deborah Tudor, Southern Illinois University, USA

Mobilizing Television

 

Doris Baltruschat, University of British Columbia, Canada

3D TV: Yet Another Dimension of Viewing Television?

 

W. Joe Watson, Baker University, USA

Availability of Culture: How Technological Advances are Changing Access to Global Television Networks

 

Bryce Peake, University of Oregon, USA

Lo-Fi Violations in the Age of Hi-Def streaming; or, a Cultural-Historical Semiotics of Pixilated videos

 

back to grid

 

2:30-3:45pm

 

Panel #15: What’s in an Audience? Audience Labor and Television

Room 142/144

Moderator: Horace Newcomb, University of Georgia, USA

 

Vanessa Mendes Moreira De Sa, University of Western Sydney , Australia

The Precarious, Voluntary, But Prestigious Work of Amateur Subtitlers for Downloaded TV Shows in Brazil

 

Michele Rosenthal and Rivka Ribak, University of Haifa, Israel

Unplugged:  Media Ambivalence and Avoidance in Everyday Life

 

Jonas De Meulenaere, Wendy Van den Broeck, Bram Lievens, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

From Era of Plenty to Era of Overflow: “What Shall I Watch?”

 

Louisa Stein, Middlebury College, USA

Transmedia TV Aesthetics: Do it Yourself Meets Buy it Yourself

 

Wendy Van den Broeck and Jo Pierson, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Understanding Television Practices in a Digital Home Ecology

 

back to grid

 

Panel #16: Reaching the Market: Distribution in the Digital Age, Part 2

Room 150

Moderator: Erik Palmer, Portland State University, USA

 

Aymar Jean Christian, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Can Digital Distribution Recreate Television for Indie Showrunners?

 

Wesley Jones and Kim Sheehan, University of Oregon, USA

Netflix Became the New Blockbuster: Can it be HBO, Too?

 

Mary Erickson, University of Oregon, USA

It’s a Movie! It’s TV! It’s On Demand! Distribution Dynamics under Media Convergence

 

Alisa Perren and Karen Petruska, Georgia State University, USA

Big Hollywood, Small Screens: Corporate Struggles over Distribution in the Digital Realm

 

back to grid

Panel #17: It’s a TV World, After All?: Television, Communities, and Nations

Room 350

Moderator: Priya Kapoor, Portland State University, USA

 

Senyo Ofori-Parku, University of Oregon, USA

How is Television Constructing the Environmental Sanitation Problem in the South? An Analysis of TV3 Network’s News Coverage in Ghana

 

Srinivas Panthukala, English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad

The Changing Face of Television as a Means of Communication in India

 

Graeme Turner, University of Queensland, Australia

The Persistence of Television: Sharedness, Liveness, and the Construction of Communities

 

Geoff Lealand, University of Waikoto

History as a Gameshow: New Zealand ‘Celebrates’ Fifty Years of Television

back to grid

 

4-5:15pm

 

Panel #18: Premium TV: Texts and Audiences

Room 150

Moderator: Sue Brower, Portland State University, USA

 

Michael L. Wayne, University of Virginia, USA

HBO, Quality Television Audiences and Middle-Class Taste Cultures: An Exploratory Empirical Analysis

 

K. Brenna Wardell, University of Oregon, USA

“All Hail Rome”: Prestige versus Pulp in HBO’s Rome and Starz’s Spartacus: Blood and Sand

 

Maria San Filippo, Wellesley College, USA

Bisexuality and Beyond: Confronting Compulsory Monosexuality in Post-L Word Television Drama

back to grid

 

Panel #19: Divergent/Convergent TV Space: Television and Other Industries

Room 350

Moderator: Eileen Meehan, Southern Illinois University, USA

 

Randall Nichols, Bentley University, USA

War for Your Screen?:  Television as Seen by the Video Game Industry

 

Max Dawson, Northwestern University, USA

“The Future of Television is Mobile”: Technological Convergence and Industrial Collision

 

Derek Jones, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA

How Cable Companies Survive in Today’s Television Landscape

 

Ahmet Atay, The College of Wooster, USA

The Internet Stole My Soap Opera: Explorations on the Future of Television Programming

 

back to grid

 

Panel #20: 21st Century Television

Room 142/144

Moderator: Julianne Newton, University of Oregon, USA

 

MJ Robinson, Marymount Manhattan College, USA

Channeled: Curatorial Culture and the Transformation of Television

 

Mark Stewart, University of Auckland, New Zealand

A Model for Understanding Shifts in the 21st Century Television Industry

 

Jher, University of Oregon, USA

Television Control and Curation: The Enaction of Social Media, Wikis, and Metamedia

 

August Grant, University of South Carolina, USA

Television 2030

back to grid

 

 

5:30-6:45pm

PLENARY #3

The Future of Television

Room 142/144

Moderator: Bryce Zabel, Stellar Productions / former president of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences

  • Toby Miller, University of California, Riverside
  • Lloyd Segan, Piller/Segan/Shepherd (independent content production company)
  • Tawny Schlieski, Research Scientist, Intel Labs Interaction & Experience Research Group

 

 

6:45pm                  CLOSING CONFERENCE RECEPTION

Atrium

Sponsored by the Cinema Studies Program, University of Oregon


 

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