These general studies requirements only apply to:

Students must complete six blocks outside of journalism: 16 credits (4 courses) in Literature, 8 credits (2 courses) in History, 8 credits (2 courses) in Economics and three more Additional Blocks of eight credits each. All theses courses must be from subjects within the College of Arts and Sciences. Special note for Post-Baccalaureate students: Most post-baccalaureate students complete some portion of their block requirements through their first degree. Talk to your journalism adviser to see if you can use courses from your first degree toward the 56 credits listed below.

Literature (16 credits)

Students must complete 16 credits in literature courses. When listed with a >1 notation, the courses will also count toward the university’s Arts & Letters group requirement. Below are all the literature courses listed in the 2018-19 UO Catalog. Note that no more than eight literature credits may come from “film as literature” courses (marked with a *) or courses taught in a foreign language (marked with a **). Writing, cultural studies, grammar, film-making, public speaking, speech and rhetoric courses do not count toward this requirement. Track your progress with your degree guide on DuckWeb.

Special Studies (199/399) or Experimental (410) courses from literature-type subject codes can only be approved for the literature requirement on a case-by-case basis. Verify with your SOJC advisor that the course will count toward the requirement before you register for the course.

Chinese (CHN)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • CHN 150 Introduction to Chinese Narrative
  • CHN 151 Introduction to Chinese Film*
  • CHN 152 Introduction to Chinese Popular Culture
  • CHN 305, 306, 307 History of Chinese Literature
  • CHN 308 Literature of Modern Taiwan
  • CHN 350 Gender and Sexuality in Traditional Chinese Literature
  • CHN 351 Gender and Sexuality in Modern Chinese Literature
  • CHN 380 Self and Society in Traditional Chinese Literature**
  • CHN 381 The City in Chinese Literature and Film**
  • CHN 413 Modern Chinese Texts** [Topic]
  • CHN 423 Issues in Early Chinese Literature**
  • CHN 424 Issues in Medieval Chinese Literature**
  • CHN 425 Issues in Modern Chinese Literature**
  • CHN 436, 437 Literary Chinese**
  • CHN 438 Literary Chinese Texts [Topic]
  • CHN 452 Chinese Film and Theory*/**

Cinema Studies (CINE)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • CINE 110M Introduction to Film and Media*  [Multilisted with ENG]
  • CINE 151M Introduction to Korean Cinema* [Multilisted with KRN]
  • CINE 260M Media Aesthetics* [Multilisted with ENG]
  • CINE 265, 266, 267 History of Motion Picture I, II, III*
  • CINE 381M Film, Media, and Culture* [Multilisted with ENG]

Classics (CLAS)

  • CLAS 110 Classical Mythology
  • CLAS 201 Greek Life and Culture
  • CLAS 202 Roman Life and Culture
  • CLAS 301 Greek and Roman Epic
  • CLAS 302 Greek and Roman Tragedy
  • CLAS 303 Classical Greek Philosophers
  • CLAS 310 Early China, Ancient Greece
  • CLAS 311 Death and Rebirth in Greece and India
  • CLAS 314 Gender and Sexuality in Antiquity
  • CLAS 321 Classic Myths

Comparative Literature (COLT)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • COLT 101, 102, 103 Introduction to Comparative Literature
  • COLT 211 Comparative World Literature
  • COLT 212 Comparative World Cinema*
  • COLT 231 Literature and Society
  • COLT 232 Literature and Film*
  • COLT 233 Literature and Science
  • COLT 301 Approaches to Comparative Literature
  • COLT 302 Theories of Poetry
  • COLT 303 Theories of the Novel
  • COLT 304 Theories of Drama
  • COLT 360 Gender and Identity in Literature
  • COLT 370 Comparative Comics
  • COLT 380 Top Surrealist Cinema*  – This course falls under the Topics in Comparative Media series of courses. Most course titles under this topic do not count toward the requirement (see below). “Surrealist Cinema” is an exception.
  • COLT 450 Comparative Studies in Cinema* [Topic]
  • COLT 490 Literature and Philosophy [Topic]

East Asian Languages and Literature (EALL)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • 210 China: A Cultural Odyssey
  • 211 Japan: A Cultural Odyssey.
  • 360 East Asian Cinema*

English (ENG)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • ENG 104 Introduction to Literature: Fiction
  • ENG 105 Introduction to Literature: Drama
  • ENG 106 Introduction to Literature: Poetry
  • ENG 107, 108, 109 World Literature
  • ENG 110M Introduction to Film and Media* [Multilisted with CINE]
  • ENG 205 Genre [Topic] Some topics are film*
  • ENG 207, 208 Shakespeare
  • ENG 210, 211 Survey of English Literature
  • ENG 216 Survey of American Literature
  • ENG 225 Age of King Arthur
  • ENG 230 Introduction to Environmental Literature
  • ENG 240 Introduction to Disability Studies
  • ENG 241 Introduction to African American Literature
  • ENG 242 Introduction to Asian American Literature
  • ENG 243 Introduction to Chicano and Latino Literature
  • ENG 244 Introduction to Native American Literature
  • ENG 245 Introduction to Ethnic American Literature [Topic]
  • ENG 250 Literature and Digital Culture
  • ENG 260M Media Aesthetics* [Multilisted with CINE]
  • ENG 280 Introduction to Comics Studies
  • ENG 300 Introduction to Literary Criticism
  • ENG 301, 302, 303 Foundations of the English Major
  • ENG 313 Teen and Children’s Literature
  • ENG 315 Women Writers’ Cultures [Topic]
  • ENG 316 Women Writers’ Forms [Topic]
  • ENG 321, 322, 323 English Novel
  • ENG 325 Literature of the Northwest
  • ENG 340 Jewish Writers
  • ENG 360 African American Writers
  • ENG 361 Native American Writers
  • ENG 362 Asian American Writers
  • ENG 363 Chicano and Latino Writers
  • ENG 364 Comparative Ethnic American Literatures
  • ENG 380 Film, Media, and History*
  • ENG 381M Film, Media, and Culture* [Multilisted with CINE]
  • ENG 385 Graphic Narratives and Cultural Theory
  • ENG 391, 392 American Novel
  • ENG 394, 395 20th-Century Literature
  • ENG 423 The Age of Beowulf
  • ENG 425 Medieval Romance
  • ENG 427 Chaucer
  • ENG 434 Spenser
  • ENG 436 Advanced Shakespeare
  • ENG 442 Milton
  • ENG 448 Restoration and 18th-Century Literature
  • ENG 452 19th-Century British Fiction [Topic]
  • ENG 454 English Romantic Writers
  • ENG 455 English Romantic Writers
  • ENG 461 American Literature to 1800
  • ENG 467 American Literature, 1900–Present
  • ENG 468 Ethnic Literature [Topic]
  • ENG 469 Literature and the Environment [Topic]
  • ENG 479 Major Authors [Topic]
  • ENG 480 Modern American Superhero
  • ENG 488 Race and Representation in Film* [Topic]
  • ENG 496 Feminist Film Criticism* [Topic]

Folklore (FLR)

  • FLR 250 Introduction to Folklore
  • FLR 255 Folklore and United States Popular Culture
  • FLR 370 Folklore and Sexuality

French (FR)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • FR 150 Cultural Legacies of France
  • FR 312 French Survey: Francophone Literature**
  • FR 317 French Survey: Medieval and Renaissance**
  • FR 318 French Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment**
  • FR 319 French Survey: 19th and 20th Centuries**
  • FR 330 French Poetry**
  • FR 331 French Theater**
  • FR 333 French Narrative**
  • FR 361 French Cinema for Nonmajors*
  • FR 362 French Film*/**
  • FR 450 17th-Century Literature** [Topic]
  • FR 451 Baroque Theater** [Topic]
  • FR 460 18th-Century Literature** [Topic]
  • FR 480 19th-Century Literature** [Topic]
  • FR 490 20th-Century Literature** [Topic]
  • FR 497 Francophone Women’s Writing**

German (GER)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • GER 206 Law in Literature
  • GER 220M From Kierkegaard to Kafka [Multilisted with SCAN]
  • GER 221 Postwar Germany: Nation Divided
  • GER 222 Voices of Dissent in Germany
  • GER 223 Germany: A Multicultural Society
  • GER 251 Sexuality
  • GER 252 War, Violence, Trauma
  • GER 340, 341 Introduction to German Culture and Society**
  • GER 350 Genres in German Literature
  • GER 351 Diversity in Germany
  • GER 352 Authors in German Literature
  • GER 354 German Gender Studies
  • GER 355 German Cinema: History, Theory, Practice*
  • GER 356 German Fairy Tales
  • GER 360 Introduction to German Literature: Poetry, Plays, Prose**
  • GER 361 Introduction to German Literature: Literary Movements**
  • GER 362 Introduction to German Literature: Interpretive Models**
  • GER 366, 367, 368 Themes in German Literature**
  • GER 407 Semantic Fairy Tales – This course falls under the Seminar series of courses. Most course titles under this topic do not count toward the requirement. “Semantic Fairy Tales” is an exception.
  • GER 460 German Literature** [Topic]

Honors College (HC)

  • 221H, 222H, 223H HC Arts & Letters

Note: Some HC colloquium courses may also be used toward the literature requirement. As titles vary, these are determined on a case-by-case basis. Consult your SOJC advisor.

Humanities (HUM)

  • HUM 101, 102, 103 Introduction to the Humanities I, II, III
  • HUM 245 Food, Art and Literature
  • HUM 260 Postwar European Culture
  • HUM 300 Themes in the Humanities

Italian (ITAL)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • ITAL 150 Cultural Legacies of Italy
  • ITAL 152 Desire and Resistance: Italian Cinema*
  • ITAL 317 Italian Survey: Medieval and Renaissance**
  • ITAL 318 Italian Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment**
  • ITAL 319 Italian Survey: 19th and 20th Centuries**
  • ITAL 444 Medieval and Renaissance Literature** [Topic]
  • ITAL 449 Humanism and the Renaissance**
  • ITAL 481 19th-Century Literature** [Topic]
  • ITAL 491 20th-Century Literature** [Topic]

Japanese (JPN)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • JPN 250 Manga Millennium
  • JPN 305, 306, 307 Introduction to Japanese Literature
  • JPN 425 Modern Japanese Literature** [Topic]
  • JPN 434, 435, 436 Advanced Readings in Japanese Literature**
  • JPN 471 The Japanese Cinema*
  • JPN 480 Early Modern Comics**

Korean (KRN)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • KRN 151M Introduction to Korean Cinema* [Multilisted with CINE]
  • KRN 360 Contemporary Korean Film* [Multilisted with CINE]

Portuguese (PORT)

  • PORT 150 Lusofonia: The Portuguese-Speaking World

Russian (RUSS)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • RUSS 204, 205, 206 Introduction to Russian Literature
  • RUSS 331 Russian Short Story
  • RUSS 334 Dostoevsky
  • RUSS 335 Tolstoy
  • RUSS 351 Russian Literature and Film*
  • RUSS 426 Classics of Russian Poetry** [Topic]
  • RUSS 434 Russian Literature** [Topic]

Scandinavian (SCAN)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • SCAN 220M From Kierkegaard to Kafka [Multilisted with GER]
  • SCAN 251 Text and Interpretation
  • SCAN 259 Vikings through the Icelandic Sagas
  • SCAN 315 Nordic Cinema*
  • SCAN 316 History of Cinema*
  • SCAN 343 Norse Mythology
  • SCAN 344 Medieval Hero and Monster
  • SCAN 351 Periods in Scandinavian Literature
  • SCAN 353 Scandinavian Women Writers
  • SCAN 354 Genres in Scandinavian Literature

Spanish (SPAN)

[*= film/cinema courses, **= taught in a foreign language]
  • SPAN 150 Cultures of the Spanish-Speaking World
  • SPAN 341, 342, 343, 344 Hispanic Cultures through Literature I, II, III, IV**
  • SPAN 348 United States Latino Literature and Culture**
  • SPAN 350 Introduction to Poetry**
  • SPAN 351 Introduction to Theater**
  • SPAN 353 Introduction to Narrative**
  • SPAN 431 Medieval Iberian Literature and Culture** [Topic]
  • SPAN 432 Spanish Islamic Literature and Culture** [Topic]
  • SPAN 433 Sephardic Literature and Culture** [Topic]
  • SPAN 437 Contemporary Latin American Verse** [Topic]
  • SPAN 450 Colonial Latin American Literature** [Topic]
  • SPAN 452 Renaissance and Baroque Poetry**
  • SPAN 460 Don Quixote
  • SPAN 480 19th-Century Spanish American Literature**
  • SPAN 490 20th-Century Latin American Literature** [Topic]

REMINDER:

Writing, cultural studies, grammar, film-making, public speaking, speech and rhetoric courses do not count toward this requirement. Students have petitioned the Undergraduate Affairs Committee for exceptions to the list above. The following courses have gone through this petition process and were denied:

  • ARB 353 Arab Cinema
  • CLAS 407 The Archaeology of Pompeii
  • COLT 305 Cultural Studies
  • COLT 350 Topics in Comparative Literature [Topics course; actual course titles vary]
  • COLT 380 Topics in Comparative Media [Topics course; actual course titles vary]. One exception: COLT 380 Surrealist Cinema.
  • FLR 225 Voices of Africa
  • FLR 235 Folklore and the Supernatural
  • FLR 320 Car Cultures
  • FLR 350 Folklore and the Bible
  • HUM 215 Introduction to African Studies
  • HUM 298 Medical Humanities
  • HUM 354/355 The City
  • HUM 361 Ancient Science and Culture
  • RL 399 Define American

History (8 credits)

Students must complete at least eight history credits. Below are the eligible history courses taken from the 2018-19 UO Catalog. When listed with a >2 notation, the course will also meet the university’s Social Science group requirement. Track your progress with your degree guide on DuckWeb.

Special Studies (199/399) or Experimental (410) courses can only be approved for the history requirement on a case-by-case basis. Verify with your SOJC advisor that the course will count toward the requirement before you register for the course.

Honors College (HC)

  • HC 231H, 232H, 233H Honors College Social Science

History (HIST)

  • HIST 101, 102, 103 Western Civilization
  • HIST 104, 105, 106 World History
  • HIST 121 Women in World History
  • HIST 186 Cultures of India
  • HIST 190 Foundations of East Asian Civilizations
  • HIST 191 China, Past and Present
  • HIST 192 Japan, Past and Present
  • HIST 201 Inventing America
  • HIST 202  Building the United States
  • HIST 203 American Century
  • HIST 205 Ancient Sports
  • HIST 211 Reacting to the Past
  • HIST 215 Food in World History
  • HIST 221 Sex in History
  • HIST 239 Classical and Medieval Warfare
  • HIST 240, 241 War in the Modern World I,II
  • HIST 245 Russia, America, and the World
  • HIST 248 Latinos in the Americas
  • HIST 250, 251 African American History
  • HIST 273 Introduction to American Environmental History
  • HIST 286 Cities in India and South Asia
  • HIST 301, 302, 303 Modern Europe
  • HIST 308, 309 History of Women in the United States I,II
  • HIST 319 Early Middle Ages in Europe
  • HIST 320 High Middle Ages in Europe
  • HIST 321 Late Middle Ages in Europe
  • HIST 322 The Crusades
  • HIST 325 Precolonial Africa
  • HIST 326 Colonial and Postcolonial Africa
  • HIST 332 British History [Topic]
  • HIST 336, 337 France
  • HIST 340 US Military History
  • HIST 342 German History [Topic]
  • HIST 345 Early Russia
  • HIST 346 Imperial Russia
  • HIST 347 Soviet Union and Contemporary Russia
  • HIST 350, 351 American Radicalism
  • HIST 352 The United States in the 1960s
  • HIST 361 Early Modern Science
  • HIST 363 American Business History
  • HIST 368 American West in Popular Culture
  • HIST 378 American Environmental History to 1890
  • HIST 379 American Environmental History 1890-Present
  • HIST 380, 381, 382 Latin America
  • HIST 383 Soccer and Society in Latin America
  • HIST 385 South Asia [Topic]
  • HIST 386 India
  • HIST 387 Early China
  • HIST 388 Vietnam War and the United States
  • HIST 396 Samurai in Film
  • HIST 411 Advanced Reacting to the Past
  • HIST 412 Ancient Greece [Topic]
  • HIST 414 Ancient Rome [Topic]
  • HIST 415 Advanced World History [Topic]
  • HIST 416 Advanced Women’s History [Topic]
  • HIST 417 Society and Culture in Modern Africa [Topic]
  • HIST 419 African Regional Histories [Topic]
  • HIST 420 The Idea of Europe
  • HIST 425 Economic History of Modern Europe [Topic]
  • HIST 427 Intellectual History of Modern Europe [Topic]
  • HIST 428 Europe in the 20th Century [Topic]
  • HIST 436 Medieval Central Europe [Topic]
  • HIST 437 Medieval Spain
  • HIST 441 16th-Century European Reformations
  • HIST 442 Early Modern German History [Topic]
  • HIST 443 Modern Germany [Topic]
  • HIST 444 The Holocaust
  • HIST 446 Modern Russia [Topic]
  • HIST 449 Race and Ethnicity in the American West
  • HIST 450 The Iraq War
  • HIST 451 American Foreign Relations [Topic]
  • HIST 455 Colonial American History
  • HIST 456 Revolutionary America
  • HIST 457 19th-Century United States [Topic]
  • HIST 461 American Medical History
  • HIST 463 American Economic History [Topic]
  • HIST 466, 467 The American West
  • HIST 468 The Pacific Northwest
  • HIST 469 American Indian History [Topic]
  • HIST 470 African American History to 1877 [Topic]
  • HIST 471 African American History since 1877 [Topic
  • HIST 473 American Environmental History [Topic]
  • HIST 480 Mexico
  • HIST 482 Aztecs and Incas
  • HIST 483 Latin America [Topic]
  • HIST 487 China [Topic]
  • HIST 490 Japan [Topic]
  • HIST 491 Medicine and Society in Premodern Japan
  • HIST 497 Culture, Modernity, and Revolution in China [Topic]
  • HIST 498 Early Japanese Culture and Society [Topic]

Economics (8 credits)

Students must complete at least eight economics credits. Below are the eligible economics courses taken from the 2018-19 UO Catalog. When listed with a >2, the course will also count toward the university’s Social Science group requirement. We usually discourage first-term freshmen from taking EC 201 unless they have a background or interest in the area. Track your progress with your degree guide on DuckWeb.

Special Studies (199/399) or Experimental (410) courses can only be approved for the economics requirement on a case-by-case basis. Verify with your journalism adviser that the course will count toward the requirement BEFORE you register for the course. Note: This is a complete list of economics courses taught at UO. Most journalism students fulfill this requirement by taking two of EC 101, 201 or 202.

Business (BA)

  • BA 315 Economy, Industry, and Competitive Analysis

Economics (EC)

  • EC 101 Contemporary Economic Issues
  • EC 201 Introduction to Economic Analysis: Microeconomics
  • EC 202 Introduction to Economic Analysis: Macroeconomics
  • EC 311 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
  • EC 313 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
  • EC 320 Introduction to Econometrics
  • EC 327 Introduction to Game Theory
  • EC 330 Urban and Regional Economic Problems
  • EC 333 Resource and Environmental Economic Issues
  • EC 340 Issues in Public Economics
  • EC 350 Labor Market Issues
  • EC 360 Issues in Industrial Organization
  • EC 370 Money and Banking
  • EC 380 International Economic Issues
  • EC 390 Problems and Issues in the Developing Economies
  • EC 411 Advanced Microeconomic Theory
  • EC 413 Advanced Macroeconomic Theory
  • EC 418, 419 Economic Analysis of Community Issues I,II
  • EC 421 Introduction to Econometrics
  • EC 422 Economic Forecasting
  • EC 423, 424, 425 Econometrics
  • EC 428 Behavioral and Experimental Economics
  • EC 430 Urban and Regional Economics
  • EC 432 Economy of the Pacific Northwest
  • EC 434 Environmental Economics
  • EC 435 Natural Resouce Economics
  • EC 440 Public Economics
  • EC 441 Public Economics: Taxation
  • EC 443 Health Economics
  • EC 448 Political Economics
  • EC 450 Labor Economics
  • EC 451 Issues in Labor Economics
  • EC 460 Theories of Industrial Organization
  • EC 461 Industrial Organization and Public Policy
  • EC 462 Economics of Transportation
  • EC 470 Monetary Policy
  • EC 471 Monetary Theory
  • EC 480 International Finance
  • EC 481 International Trade
  • EC 482 Economics of Globalization
  • EC 484 Multinational Corporations
  • EC 490 Economic Growth and Development
  • EC 491 Issues in Economic Growth and Development
  • EC 493 The Evolution of Economic Ideas

Additional Block #1, #2, #3 (8 credits per block)

In addition to the literature, history and economics block requirements, students must complete three additional blocks. Each block consists of eight credits of a subject offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. Eligible subjects are: AEIS, AFR, ANTH, ARB, ASIA, ASL, ASTR, BI, CAS, CH, CHN, CINE, CIS, CIT, CLAS, COLT, CRWR, DANE, EALL, EC, ENG, ENVS, ES, EURO, FINN, FLR, FR, GEOG, GEOL, GER, GRK, HBRW, HC, HIST, HPHY, HUM, INTL, ITAL, JDST, JPN, KRN, LAS, LAT, LING, LT, MATH, MDVL, NORW, PHIL, PHYS, PORT, PS, PSY, REES, REL, RL, RUSS, SCAN,  SOC, SPAN, SWAH, SWED, TA, WGS, WR.

The Additional Blocks CAN overlap with the following requirements:

  • Classes taken to fulfill the university’s Arts & Letters (>1), Social Science (>2) and Science (>3) group requirements (unless the class is also being used for SOJC requirements in literature, history or economics.)
  • Classes taken toward the UO Bachelor of Science requirement.
  • Minor and second major coursework in the College of Arts and Sciences.
  • Electives in the College of Arts and Sciences.

The Additional Blocks CANNOT overlap with:

  • First- and second-year foreign language (if used for the Bachelor of Arts degree)
  • Writing Composition (WR) classes used for the UO writing requirement.
  • Courses used for the literature, history or economics requirements in the SOJC.

This requirement and the potential for overlap with other requirements can be very complicated and highly individualized. Please speak with your SOJC advisor to learn about your options.