56-credit “block” requirements

All journalism students must complete six blocks outside of journalism: 16 credits (4 courses) in Literature, 8 credits (2 courses) in History, 8 credits (2 courses) in Economics and three more Additional Blocks of eight credits each. All theses courses must be from subjects within the College of Arts and Sciences. Special note for Post-Baccalaureate students: Most post-baccalaureate students complete some portion of their block requirements through their first degree. Talk to your journalism adviser to see if you can use courses from your first degree toward the 56 credits listed below.

Literature (16 credits)

All journalism majors must complete 16 credits in literature courses. When listed with a >1 or A&L notation, the courses will also count toward the university’s Arts & Letters group requirement. Below are all the literature courses listed in the 2014-15 UO Catalog. Note that no more than eight literature credits may come from “film as literature” courses (marked with a *) or courses taught in a foreign language (marked with a **). Writing, cultural studies, grammar, film-making, public speaking, speech and rhetoric courses do not count toward this requirement. Track your progress with your Degree Audit Report on DuckWeb.

Special Studies (199/399) or Experimental (410) courses from literature-type subject codes can only be approved for the literature requirement on a case-by-case basis. Verify with your journalism adviser that the course will count toward the requirement before you register for the course.

Chinese (CHN)

  • 150 Introduction to the Chinese Novel (4) Introduction to aesthetic and cultural values that shape Chinese narratives. Emphasis on traditional or modern novels. No background in Chinese necessary; taught in English.
  • 151 Introduction to Chinese Film* (4) Introduction to the cinemas of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, featuring films by directors Zhang Yimou, Chen Kaige, John Woo, Wong Kar-Wei, and Ang Lee. No background in Chinese necessary; English subtitles.
  • 152 Introduction to Chinese Popular Culture (4) Introduction to popular Chinese cultures in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the United States; discussing nationalism, globalization, identity, and gender. No background in Chinese necessary; taught in English.
  • 305, 306, 307 History of Chinese Literature (4,4,4) Survey ranging from early Confucian and Daoist classics through Tang and Song poetry, short fiction and novels, the 1919 May Fourth Movement writers, and into the contemporary period. Readings in English.
  • 308 Literature of Modern Taiwan (4) Surveys the literature of Taiwan from the postwar era to the present. Discussion focuses on national identity, gender, class, modernization, and globalization. Taught in English.
  • 350 Gender and Sexuality in Traditional Chinese Literature (4) Examines the changing constructions of gender and sexuality in premodern China. Topics include arranged marriage and concubinage, attitudes toward transgender play. No background in Chinese necessary; readings in English.
  • 351 Gender and Sexuality in Modern Chinese Literature (4) Primary and secondary works about women, sexuality, and changing gender roles in republican, socialist, and post-Mao China. Readings in English.
  • 380 Self and Society in Traditional Chinese Literature** (4) Examines the role of the self in premodern Chinese society through reading some of the most important works in traditional Chinese literature. Taught in Chinese. Prereq: proficiency in modern Chinese as confirmed by instructor.
  • 381 The City in Chinese Literature and Film** (4) Examines urbanization and urban culture in Chinese literature and film. Instruction in Chinese.
  • 413 Modern Chinese Texts** [Topic] (4R) Readings and discussion in Chinese of Chinese modern literary and cultural texts. Topics change yearly. R once, with instructor’s consent and when topic changes, for maximum of 8 credits.
  • 423 Issues in Early Chinese Literature** (4) Explores scholarship on and questions raised about early Chinese literary forms; examines the notions of history and narrative.
  • 424 Issues in Medieval Chinese Literature** (4) Explores scholarship on and questions raised about Chinese poetry and its characteristics.
  • 425 Issues in Modern Chinese Literature** (4) Explores scholarship on and questions raised about modern Chinese literature and culture; includes realism, modernism, gender, and literary form.
  • 436, 437 Literary Chinese** (4,4) Readings in various styles and genres of classical Chinese literature; stress on major works of different periods. Preparation for research.
  • 438 Literary Chinese Texts** [Topic] (4R) Focus on a theme in classical Chinese texts. Topics change yearly. R once for maximum of 8 credits.
  • 452 Chinese Film and Theory*/** (4) Examines Chinese film and film theory. Focuses on Chinese film in cultural debate and in the international film arena.

Classics (CLAS)

  • 110 Classical Mythology (4) Introduction to the world of Greek and Roman mythology with an emphasis on the issues of personal and social identity.
  • 201 Greek Life and Culture (4) Uses literary sources, art, and architecture to examine Greek civilization from Mycenean times to the conquest of Rome.
  • 202 Roman Life and Culture (4) Examines Roman civilization from the founding of Rome in the 8th century BC to the victory of Constantine and his religion early in the 4th century AD.
  • 301 Greek and Roman Epic (4) Analysis of the heroic tradition and epic themes in the Homeric poems, the works of Hesiod, and the Aeneid. Emphasis on literary criticism and intellectual history.
  • 302 Greek and Roman Tragedy (4) Examination of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and perhaps Seneca from the viewpoint of literary criticism and intellectual history.
  • 303 Classical Greek Philosophers (4) Introduction to the philosophies of Plato and/or Aristotle from the viewpoint of Greek intellectual history.
  • 310 Early China, Ancient Greece (4) Examines the relationship between knowledge and wisdom in literature produced by two different ancient civilizations, Greece and China, from c. 1000 BCE to 86 CE. 
  • 311 Death and Rebirth in Greece and India (4) Explores Greco-Roman and Indian conceptions of the soul and beliefs concerning the afterlife, particularly those of reincarnation and soul transmigration.
  • 314 Gender and Sexuality in Antiquity (4) Introduction to construction of the categories of norms of Western sexuality through study of Greek and Roman attitudes toward gender roles, homo- and heterosexuality, the family, and privacy.
  • 321 Classic Myths (4) The major mythological cycles of the ancient world: Troy, Thebes, and heroes. Literary and mythographic sources.

Comparative Literature (COLT)

  • 101, 102, 103 Introduction to Comparative Literature (4,4,4) Introduction to the comparative study of literature. 101: world literature, emphasis on literary genre, historical period. 102: world literature in its social and political contexts. 103: visual culture from around the world.
  • 211 Comparative World Literature (4) Explores literature from a global standpoint. Examines movement of literary forms (e.g., genres, motifs, rhetorical modes) from one culture, region, historical epoch to the next.
  • 212 Comparative World Cinema* (4) Introduces the principles of comparative analysis, exploring the aesthetic, ideological, and socioeconomic exchanges between national cinematic traditions. Themes vary by instructor. Recent themes include Melodrama, Zombies, Queer Cinema.
  • 231 Literature and Society (4) Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of literature in relation to society and politics. Draws on perspectives from political science, law, sociology, and related fields. 
  • 232 Literature and Film* (4) Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of literature and film. Draws on perspectives from cinema studies, media aesthetics, and related fields. 
  • 233 Literature and Science (4) Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of literature in relation to science and technology. Draws on perspectives from the philosophy of science, history of science and the sociology of knowledge.
  • 301 Approaches to Comparative Literature (4) Introduction to theory and methods in comparative literature, with some attention to the history and problems of the discipline.
  • 302 Theories of Poetry (4) Introduction to the study of poetry and poetic form from a world perspective.
  • 303 Theories of the Novel (4) Introduction to the study of narrative and the novel from a world perspective.
  • 304 Theories of Drama (4) Introduction to the study of drama and performance from a world perspective.
  • 360 Gender and Identity in Literature (4) Introduction to the study of gender in literature, from Asia to Europe to the Americas, and from the classics to the late 20th century. 
  • 370 Comparative Comics (4) Examines genre of narrative from a comparative and global standpoint, reviewing the impact of comics and other visual media on questions of national, regional, and ethnic identity.
  • 380 Top Surrealist Cinema* (4) – This course falls under the Topics in Comparative Media series of courses. Most course titles under this topic do not count toward the requirement (see below). “Surrealist Cinema” is an exception.
  • 450 Comparative Studies in Cinema* [Topic] (4R) Advanced consideration of the aesthetic (including literary) and cultural contexts of world film. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

East Asian Languages and Literature (EALL)

  • 210 China: A Cultural Odyssey (4) Introduction to the distinctive features of China’s linguistic, literary, artistic, and religio-philosophical heritage. Includes guest lectures, films.
  • 211 Japan: A Cultural Odyssey (4) Introduction to distinctive features of Japan’s linguistic, literary, artistic, and religio-philosophical heritage. Includes guest lectures, films.
  • 360 East Asian Cinema* (4) Examination of East Asian cinema in the context of the immense political and cultural transformations in Asia over the past century.

English (ENG)

  • 104, 105, 106 Introduction to Literature (4,4,4) Works representing the principal literary genres. 104: fiction. 105: drama. 106: poetry. 
  • 107 World Literature (4) Reading and analysis of selected works in a global survey of ancient literatures, 2500 BCE–1500 CE. 
  • 108 World Literature (4) Reading and analysis of selected works in a global survey of the early modern period to the industrial revolution, 1500 CE–1789 CE.  
  • 109 World Literature (4) Reading and analysis of selected works in a global survey from the industrial revolution onward, 1789 CE–present.
  • 110 Introduction to Film and Media* (4) Basic critical approaches to film and media studies. Analysis and interpretation of film and media.
  • 207, 208 Shakespeare (4,4) The major plays in chronological order with emphasis in the first term on the early and middle plays through Hamlet and in the second term on the later plays beginning with Twelfth Night.
  • 210, 211 Survey of English Literature (4,4) The principal works of English literature selected to represent major writers, literary forms, and significant currents of thought. 210: to 1789. 211: 1789 to the present.
  • 215, 216 Survey of American Literature (4,4) American literature from its beginnings to the present. 215: to 1850. 216: 1850 to the present.
  • 220, 221, 222 Introduction to the English Major (4,4,4) Chronological study of literary works in English considered in the context of cultural histories. 220: beginnings to 17th century. 221: 17th to 19th centuries. 222: 19th century to present.
  • 225 Age of King Arthur (4) Introduction to the literature of the Middle Ages set against the backdrop of medieval culture.
  • 230 Introduction to Environmental Literature (4)Introduction to literature that examines the human place in the natural world. Consideration of how writers understand environmental crises and scientific ideas of their generation.
  • 241 Introduction to African American Literature (4) African American literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts.
  • 242 Introduction to Asian American Literature (4) Asian American literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts.
  • 243 Introduction to Chicano and Latino Literature (4) Chicano and Latino literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts.
  • 244 Introduction to Native American Literature (4) Native American literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts.
  • 245 Introduction to Ethnic American Literature [Topic] (4R)American ethnic literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts. Repeatable once when topic changes for a maximum of 8 credits.
  • 246 Introduction to Global Literature in English [Topic] (4R)World Anglophone literature presented as literary responses to colonial history, displacement, and exile in order to understand English as a global language of literary expression. Repeatable once when topic changes for a maximum of 8 credits.
  • 260 Media Aesthetics* (4) Conventions of visual representation in still photography, motion pictures, and video.
  • 265, 266, 267 History of the Motion Picture* (4,4,4) The historical evolution of cinema as an institution and art form from its origins to present. Sequence.
  • 280 Introduction to Comics Studies (4) Introduction to the art of comics and the methodologies of comics studies.
  • 300 Introduction to Literary Criticism (4) Various techniques and approaches to literary criticism (e.g., historical, feminist, formalist, deconstructionist, Freudian, Marxist, semiotic) and their applications.
  • 313 Teen and Children’s Literature (4) Books for young readers, their social implications and historical context, from the 19th century to the present. Coreq: ENG 404 Internship: Community Literacy.
  • 315 Women Writers’ Cultures [Topic] (4R)Women’s writing in a particular cultural matrix (race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, region, religion) examined in the context of feminist literary theories. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 316 Women Writers’ Forms [Topic] (4R)Women’s writing in a particular genre or form (prose, fiction, drama, poetry, autobiography, folksong) examined in the context of current feminist literary theories. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 321, 322, 323 English Novel (4,4,4) 321: Rise of the novel from Defoe to Austen. 322: Scott to Hardy. 323: Conrad to the present.
  • 325 Literature of the Northwest (4) Survey of significant Pacific Northwest literature as set against the principles of literary regionalism.
  • 340 Jewish Writers (4) Forms and varieties of fiction, poetry, and drama by Jewish writers from the 19th century to the present.
  • 352 Shakespeare on Page and Stage (4) Intermediate-level study of Shakespeare’s plays and poems. Supplements traditional lectures and texts with acting workshops, film, live theater viewings, and student performances.
  • 360 African American Writers (4) Examines the origins and development of African American writing in relevant cultural, social, and historical contexts.
  • 361 Native American Writers (4) Examines the origins and development of Native American writing in relevant cultural, social, and historical contexts.
  • 362 Asian American Writers (4) Examines the origins and development of Asian American writing in relevant cultural, social and historical contexts.
  • 363 Chicano and Latino Writers (4) Examines the origins and development of Chicano and Latino writing in relevant cultural, social, and historical contexts.
  • 364 Comparative Ethnic American Literatures (4) Comparative examination of major issues in African, Asian, Chicano, and Native American writing in relevant contexts.
  • 365 Global Literatures in English (4) Examination of non-U.S. and non-British authors writing in English in relation to the historical, cultural, and intellectual contexts of their native countries.
  • 380 Film, Media, and History* (4) Study of the history of institutions and industries that shape production and reception of film and media.
  • 381 Film, Media, and Culture* (4) Study of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.
  • 385 Graphic Narratives and Cultural Theory (4) Survey of 20th- and 21st-century graphic novels in the context of cultural theory.
  • 391, 392 American Novel (4,4) Development of the American novel from its beginnings to the present. 391: beginnings to 1900. 392: 1900 to present.
  • 394, 395 20th-Century Literature (4,4) Modern literature from American, British, and European cultures. Significant works of poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction in relation to intellectual and historical developments. 394: 1890 to 1945. 395: 1945 to present.
  • 421 The Bible and Literature (4) The Bible, Old and New Testaments, as a model for and influence on secular literature.
  • 423 The Age of Beowulf (4) A reading of Anglo-Saxon literature and culture as the intersection of Germanic, Celtic, and Christian traditions. Readings include Irish epic, Welsh romance, Norse mythology, and Icelandic saga.
  • 425 Medieval Romance (4) Study of selected romances in the context of European intellectual and social history. May include elementary linguistic introduction to Middle English.
  • 427 Chaucer (4) Close textual study of selected Canterbury Tales in Middle English; instruction in the grammar and pronunciation of Chaucer’s language.
  • 434 Spenser (4) Examines the works of Edmund Spenser.
  • 436 Advanced Shakespeare (4) Detailed study of selected plays, poetry, or both.
  • 438 Shakespeare’s Rivals (4) Representative plays by Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, and other early 17th-century dramatists.
  • 440 17th-Century Poetry and Prose (4) Poetry from the Metaphysicals and Jonson to the Restoration; prose from Burton and Bacon to Hobbes and Milton.
  • 442 Milton (4) Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes.
  • 446, 447, 448 Restoration and 18th-Century Literature (4,4,4) 446/546: Restoration period. 447/547: primarily Swift, Gay, Defoe, and Pope. 448/548: Johnson and his circle; classic to romantic; relations between England and the Enlightenment in France.
  • 451 19th-Century Studies [Topic] (4R) Comparative studies of selected problems and figures on both sides of the Atlantic; treating topics in literature, the fine arts, and social history. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 452 19th-Century British Fiction [Topic] (4R) Close study of selected novels. Repeatable once when topic changes for maximum of 8 credits.
  • 454 English Romantic Writers (4) Romantic thought and expression. The first generation including Blake, Coleridge, Dorothy and William Wordsworth.
  • 455 English Romantic Writers (4) Romantic thought and expression of the second generation, including Byron, Keats, Mary and Percy Bysshe Shelley.
  • 457 Victorian Literature and Culture:[Topic]. (4) Exploration of major works, figures, controversies, social and cultural issues. Readings in Victorian fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfictional prose; study of examples of the visual arts and popular culture. Repeatable when topic changes for maximum of 8 credits.
  • 461 American Literature to 1800 (4) Readings in American poetry, nonfiction prose, drama, and fiction.
  • 462 American Literature, 1800–1900 (4) Readings primarily in American poetry, nonfiction prose, drama, and fiction.
  • 466 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature [Topic] (4R) Focused study of authors, genres, and literary movements related to literature written in English about and in former colonies of American or European nations. R twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.
  • 467 American Literature, 1900–Present (4) Readings in American poetry, nonfiction prose, drama, and fiction.
  • 468 Ethnic Literature [Topic] (4R) Advanced study of one or more authors or literary genres related to ethnic literature including African, Native, Asian, or Chicano American. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.
  • 469 Literature and the Environment [Topic] (4) In-depth study of various topics related to literature and the environment including Nature and Myth, Idea of Wilderness, Rhetoric of Nature Writing. R thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
  • 475 Modern Poetry (4) 20th-century British and American poetry with emphasis on the modernist period, 1910–45. Representative authors include Yeats, Stein, Pound, Eliot, H. D., Williams, and Stevens.
  • 476 Modern Fiction (4) Representative modern fiction writers in English, American, and Continental literatures, such as Joyce, Woolf, Stein, Faulkner, Proust, Kafka, and Mann.
  • 479 Major Authors [Topic] (4R) In-depth study of one to three major authors from medieval through modern periods.
  • 480 Modern American Superhero. (4) Examination of the path of the American comic book superhero and an exploration of the ways in which that journey reflects large processes of social change.
  • 498 Studies in Women and Literature: [Topic] (4R) Topics vary from year to year. The following list is representative: African American Women Writers, Gender of Modernism, Lesbian Literature and Theory, Renaissance Women, Women’s Autobiography.

Folklore (FLR)

  • 250 Introduction to Folklore (4) The process and genres of traditional (i.e., folk) patterning; the relations between these forms of expression and other arts, especially English and American literature.
  • 255 Folklore and United States Popular Culture (4) Explores the relationship between folklore and popular culture, with special emphasis on the analysis of legends, myths, icons, stereotypes, heroes, celebrities, rituals, and celebrations.
  • 370 Folklore and Sexuality (4) Examines intersections of folklore and sexuality as entry points for discussing social issues of sexual and gender identity, intolerance, and resistance.
  • 416/516 African Folklore (4) Examines folklore forms across the African continent to analyze themes of history, identity, aesthetics, gender, class, politics, and globalization.

French (FR)

  • 150 Cultural Legacies of France (4) French civilization in France and beyond. Possible topics are the Francophone world, premodern, early modern, and modern France; French film, architecture, and painting. Conducted in English.
  • 312. French Survey: Francophone Literature (4)** Introduction to major authors and texts of the French-speaking world outside of France. Prereq: FR 301 or 302
  • 317 French Survey: Medieval and Renaissance** (4) Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the medieval and Renaissance periods through the reading of representative texts. Prereq: FR 301 or 303.
  • 318 French Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment** (4) Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the 17th and 18th centuries through the reading of representative texts. Prereq: FR 301 or 303.
  • 319 French Survey: 19th and 20th Centuries** (4) Representative literary works from the 19th and 20th centuries with attention to literary analysis and literary history. Prereq: FR 301 or 303.
  • 330 French Poetry** (4) Poems from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, literary movements, introduction to textual analysis and modern critical approaches. Prereq: FR 301, 303.
  • 331 French Theater** (4) Explores important aspects of French theater. Reading plays from different periods. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading. Prereq: FR 301, 303.
  • 333 French Narrative** (4) Covers important aspects of French narrative. Reading texts from different periods. Emphasis on formal aspects and critical reading. Prereq: FR 301, 303.
  • 342 French Literature in Translation [Topic] (4R) In-depth examination of French aesthetic and intellectual movements through the reading in translation and discussion of theoretical texts and creative fiction. Conducted in English. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 362 French Film*/** (4) Explores the values and legacies of French culture on the continent and the former colonies as reflected in French films and texts.
  • 450 17th-Century Literature** [Topic] (4R) Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 17th-century French literature. Prereq: FR 317, 318, 319. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 451 Baroque Theater** [Topic] (4R) Intensive study of representative plays by Molière, Racine, or Corneille with emphasis on modern criticism. Prereq: FR 315, 317, 319. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 460 18th-Century Literature** [Topic] (4R) Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 18th-century French literature. A recent topic is Being Modern in the 18th century. Prereq: FR 317, 318, 319. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 480 19th-Century Literature** [Topic] (4R) Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 19th-century French literature. Prereq for 480: FR 317, 318, 319. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 490 20th-Century Literature** [Topic] (4R) Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 20th-century French literature. Recent topics include African Identities, The French Novel in 2000, Postcolonial Africa. Prereq: FR 317, 318, 319. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 497 Francophone Women’s Writing** (4) Developments in literature by women from areas such as Maghreb, the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, Quebec, the Indian Ocean, and Europe. Prereq: FR 317, 318, 319.

German (GER)

  • 221 Postwar Germany: Nation Divided (4) Introduction to literary and cultural movements of public dissent, including 1960s student revolutions, in postwar Germany. Conducted in English.
  • 222 Voices of Dissent in Germany (4) Key debates in German culture, including the adequate representation of the Holocaust, literature in society, and the roles of ethnic and gender identities within the nation. Readings and discussion in English.
  • 223 Germany: A Multicultural Society (4) Examines the multiethnic complexities of German, Austrian, and/or Swiss societies through the writings of African, Turkish, or Jewish Germans. Period of focus varies. Conducted in English.
  • 257, 258, 259 German Culture and Thought (4,4,4) Introduction to German literature, art, music, philosophy, and history through analysis and discussion of selected documents from different periods, genres, and media. 257: from Luther to Marx. 258: from Schopenhauer to Musil. 259: culture of the Weimar Republic. Conducted in English.
  • 340, 341 Introduction to German Culture and Society** (4,4) Writings by such figures as Kant, Marx, Freud, and Weber. 340: the emergence of Germany as a cultural and political entity explored through literature, film, and art. 341: the German crisis of modernization. Readings, discussion, and written assignments in German. Prereq: GER 311.
  • 350 Genres in German Literature (4) Studies on such genres in German literature as Novelle, 20th-century drama, political poetry. Conducted in English.
  • 351 Diversity in Germany (4) Examines the social construction of identity in German literature and culture. Addresses topics of plural voices and tolerance in German-speaking cultures. Topics vary. Conducted in English.
  • 352 Authors in German Literature (4) Representative works by writers such as Lessing, Schiller, Hoffmann, Brentano, Droste-Hülshoff, Kafka, Fleisser, Brecht, and Nietzsche. Conducted in English.
  • 354 German Gender Studies (4) Student oral presentations and written papers on such topics as men and women writers of German romanticism, mothers and daughters in German literature, comparison of men and women dramatists. Conducted in English.
  • 355 German Cinema: History, Theory, Practice* (4) In-depth analysis of various facets of German cinema. Topics include film and the Third Reich, cinema and technology, German filmmakers in American exile, German New Wave. Conducted in English.
  • 356 German Fairy Tales (4) The German fairy tale in historical, cross-cultural, and theoretical context, from the Brothers Grimm and romantic tales to adaptations by Tchaikovsky and Sendak. Taught in English.
  • 360 Introduction to German Literature: Poetry, Plays, Prose** (4) Introduction to textual analysis—poetry, plays, and prose from 1800 to the present—in the context of major literary movements (romanticism, realism, modernism) and their social determinants. Prereq: GER 311.
  • 361 Introduction to German Literature: Literary Movements** (4) See description for GER 360. Focuses on literary movements. Prereq: GER 311.
  • 362 Introduction to German Literature: Interpretive Models** (4) See description for GER 360. Focuses on interpretive models. Prereq: GER 311.
  • 366, 367, 368 Themes in German Literature** (4,4,4) Significant literary texts organized by theme—crime and society, travels and explorations, nature and technology, relationships between the sexes, the Nazi past. Prereq: GER 311.
  • 407 Seminar** [Topic] (Course titles vary; discuss options with an SOJC advisor) GER 407 Semantic Fairy Tales has been approved for this requirement. Other courses will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis.
  • 460 German Literature** [Topic] (4R) Representative writers (e.g., Lessing, Heine, Kafka, Brecht, Bachmann, or Wolf) or pervasive themes (e.g., peace movements, art and illusion, family and society, history and literature, the political imagination). Prereq: one upper-division GER course in literature or culture. Repeatable when topic changes.

Honors College (HC)

  • 221, 222, 223 (H) Honors College Literature (4,4,4) Literary history and modes of literary analysis and interpretation. 221:premodern literature. 222: modern literature. 223: research in literature.

Note: Some HC colloquium courses may also be used toward the literature requirement. As titles vary, these are determined on a case-by-case basis. Consult your journalism adviser.

Humanities (HUM)

  • 101 Introduction to the Humanities I (4) Ideas and modes of vision Western culture has inherited from the classical period. Readings and discussions focus on literature, philosophy, history, the arts, and religion.
  • 102 Introduction to the Humanities II (4) Ideas and modes of vision Western culture has inherited from the medieval to the Renaissance periods. Readings and discussions focus on literature, philosophy, history, the arts, and religion.
  • 103 Introduction to the Humanities III (4) Ideas and modes of vision Western culture has inherited from the Age of Enlightenment to the modern period. Readings and discussions focus on literature, philosophy, the arts, and science.
  • 245 Food, Art and Literature (4) The study of food in the Ancient Greco-Roman world using historical, literary, and practical approaches.
  • 260 Postwar European Culture (4) Addresses the broad history and culture of 20th-century Europe through humanistic themes and texts that reflect various aspects of that experience.
  • 300 Themes in the Humanities (4) Interdisciplinary and multimedia introduction to the study of the humanities. Analysis of such themes as tragedy in music, literature, and art.

Italian (ITAL)

  • 150 Cultural Legacies of Italy (4) Italy’s contributions to world cultures includes topics such as modern Italian life, Italians in America, Italian cinema and its influence, the Italian Renaissance, Roman art, opera. Conducted in English.
  • 151 Italian Cinema* (2R) Explores a variety of topics of cultural interest through discussions based on weekly viewings of films in Italian. Discussion in English. Repeatable once for a maximum of 4 credits.
  • 317 Italian Survey: Medieval and Renaissance** (4) Introduction to major themes and ideas in Italian literature and art from the medieval and Renaissance periods. Prereq: ITAL 203. Conducted in Italian.
  • 318 Italian Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment** (4) Introduction to major themes and ideas in Italian literature from the baroque and Enlightenment periods through the reading of representative texts. Conducted in Italian. Prereq: ITAL 203.
  • 319 Italian Survey: 19th and 20th Centuries** (4) Representative literary works from the 19th and 20th centuries with attention to literary analysis and literary history. Conducted in Italian. Prereq: ITAL 203.
  • 341 Dante in Translation (4) The entire Divine Comedy read in English. Focuses on specific medieval components, relevance for modern readers, effects and process of translation. Conducted in English. No major or minor credit.
  • 444 Medieval and Renaissance Literature** [Topic] (4–6R) Focuses on a topic from 13th- to 16th-century Italy (e.g., medieval foundations of the Renaissance, Petrarch and Petrarchism, representations of otherness, Boccaccio and his influence). Conducted in Italian. Prereq: ITAL 317 or 318 or 319. Repeatble twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 449 Humanism and the Renaissance** (4) Covers authors who exemplify learning, aesthetics, and ideology of Renaissance Italy (e.g., Ariosto, Castiglione, Colonna, Franco, Leonardo, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Tasso). Includes essays in criticism and theory. Conducted in Italian. Prereq: ITAL 317 or 318 or 319.
  • 481 19th-Century Literature** [Topic] (4R) Topics concerning issues or authors in 19th-century Italian literature (e.g., Irony and Novel, Leopardi and Italian Romanticism). Conducted in Italian. Prereq: ITAL 317 or 318 or 319. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 491 20th-Century Literature** [Topic] (4R) Topics about issues or figures in 20th-century Italian literature (e.g., Modern Lyric Poetry, Postmodern Narrative). Conducted in Italian. Prereq: ITAL 317 or 318 or 319. Repeatable when topic changes.

Japanese (JPN)

  • 250 Manga Millennium (4) Surveys the 1,000-year history of visual-verbal narratives—comics—in Japan, ranging from medieval picture to modern manga. Readings, lectures and discussion in English.
  • 305, 306, 307 Introduction to Japanese Literature (4,4,4) Historical survey of Japanese literature from the 8th century to the present. Analysis and appreciation of major works, genres, and authors such as The Tale of Genji, Haiku, Kawabata, and Mishima. Readings in English.
  • 425 Modern Japanese Literature** [Topic] (4R) Investigates topics relevant to Japanese literary studies in a comparative context. Recent topics include suicide and literature East and West, nations and resistance, atomic bomb literature. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 434, 435, 436 Advanced Readings in Japanese Literature** (4,4,4) Reading modern Japanese literature in Japanese. Students acquire proficiency in reading, writing, and translation as well as knowledge of literature. Prereq: JPN 416/516.
  • 471 The Japanese Cinema* (4) Major filmmakers and works are introduced. Comparative analysis of Japanese cinema as narrative form and artists’ efforts to grapple with the Japanese experience of modernity. Readings, films, and discussions in English.

Korean (KRN)

  • 151 Introduction to Korean Cinema* (4) Surveys Korean national cinema, from the earliest days of the medium to the present.
  • 360 Contemporary Korean Film* (4) Introduction to contemporary South Korean film. Explores changes in film culture, practice, and industry in relation to social changes since the early 1990s.

Portuguese (PORT)

  • 150 Lusofonia: The Portuguese-Speaking World (4) Topics in the history and contemporary cultures of the regions where Portuguese is spoken (Portugal, Brazil, Africa, Asia, and North America).

Russian (RUSS)

  • 204, 205, 206 Introduction to Russian Literature (4,4,4) Survey of Russian literature from its origins to the present; emphasis on Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and contemporary works. Readings, lectures, and discussions in English.
  • 331 Russian Short Story (4) Analysis of short stories by important 19th- and 20th-century Russian writers in the context of social, political, and literary development. Readings in English.
  • 334 Dostoevsky (4) Introduction to the novels and short stories of Dostoevsky. His literary, ethical, and political development. Readings and instruction in English.
  • 335 Tolstoy (4) Examines short and long works by Leo Tolstoy, focusing on ethical questions and Tolstoy’s literary art. Readings and instruction in English.
  • 340 Russian Women in Literature (4) Explores writings and lives of Russian women in the 19th and 20th centuries and their image in literature. Readings and instruction in English.
  • 351 Russian Literature and Film* (4) Introduction to great works of 19th-century Russian literature and analysis of the cinematic adaptation of these works by Western filmmakers.
  • 426 Classics of Russian Poetry** [Topic] (4R) Comprehensive study of selected topics in Russian poetry (e.g., Alexander Pushkin, Russian symbolism, acmeism, futurism, and contemporary poetry). Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 434 Russian Literature** [Topic] (4R) Comprehensive study of selected topics in Russian literature, (e.g., 20th-century, contemporary, and Old Russian literature). Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Scandinavian (SCAN)

  • 251 Text and Interpretation (4) Introduction to textual analysis; explores the relationship between experience, description, and identity through the reading and viewing of Scandinavian literature and film. Students may not receive credit for both SCAN 250 and SCAN 251.
  • 259 Vikings through the Icelandic Sagas (4) Introduction to the social, political, and cultural expressions of Viking society through the Sagas, the unique prose narratives of medieval Iceland Conducted in English.
  • 315 Nordic Cinema* (4) Examines cinematic culture in the Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Includes works by Ingmar Bergman and the Danish group Dogma 95.
  • 316 History of Cinema* (4) A survey of Nordic cinema from the silent era to the present. Films will be viewed and analyzed within their aesthetic and historical contexts. Offered alternate years.
  • 351 Periods in Scandinavian Literature (4) Possible topics are modern breakthrough and modernism in Scandinavian literature. Student discussion, oral presentations, and written papers. Conducted in English. This class is not repeatable.
  • 352 Topics in Scandinavian Literature (4) Topics include war and peace, folk literature, film as narrative. Student discussion, oral presentations, and written papers. Conducted in English.
  • 353 Scandinavian Women Writers (4) Examines social issues, especially gender, in literature written by women from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Primary emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century texts.
  • 354 Genres in Scandinavian Literature (4) Recent topics include short narrative fiction and Scandinavian drama. Student discussion, oral presentations, and written papers. Conducted in English.

Spanish (SPAN)

  • 150 Cultures of the Spanish-Speaking World (4) Rich cultural heritage of the Spanish-speaking world. Topics include Jewish, Arabic, and Christian relations in medieval Iberia; the encounter with the New World; Hispanic experience in the United States. Conducted in English.
  • 151 Spanish Cinema*/** (2R) Explores a variety of topics of cultural interest through discussions based on weekly viewings of films in Spanish. Repeatable once for a maximum of 4 credits.
  • 316, 317 Survey of Peninsular Spanish Literature (4,4) Introduction to major themes and ideas from peninsular Spanish literature through the reading of representative texts. 316: medieval period to 1800; 317: 1800 to the present. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.
  • 318 Survey of Spanish American Literature** (4) Introduction to main currents and literary works in the colonial Spanish American period from a historical perspective. Critical readings of selected texts from colonial times. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305.
  • 319 Survey of Spanish American Literature** (4) Introduction to basic currents and movements in contemporary Spanish American literature from a historical perspective. Critical readings of selected poems, short fiction, and plays. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305.
  • 328 Hispanic Literature in the United States** (4) Introduction to Hispanic literature written in the United States. Close reading and discussion of selected texts by Hispanic authors. Emphasis on literary trends and themes. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305.
  • 330 Introduction to Spanish Poetry** (4) Explores important aspects of Spanish poetry. Reading poems from different periods of Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305.
  • 331 Introduction to Spanish Theater** (4) Explores important aspects of Spanish theater. Reading plays from different periods of Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305.
  • 333 Introduction to Spanish Narrative** (4) Explores important aspects of Spanish narrative. Reading texts from different periods of Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305.
  • 341 Hispanic Cultures through Literature I** (4) Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from 1100 to 1600. Series with SPAN 342, 343, 344. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.
  • 342 Hispanic Cultures through Literature II** (4) Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from the 16th century to the Latin American independences. Series with SPAN 341, 343, 344. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.
  • 343 Hispanic Cultures through Literature III** (4) Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from the revolutionary wars to the Spanish Civil War. Series with SPAN 341, 342, 344. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.
  • 344 Hispanic Cultures through Literature IV** (4) Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from the 20th century into the 21st. Series with SPAN 341, 342, 343. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.
  • 348 United States Latino Literature and Culture** (4) Introduction to Hispanic literature written in the United States. Close reading and discussion of selected texts by Hispanic authors; emphasis on literary trends and themes. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.
  • 350 Introduction to Poetry** (4) Explores important aspects of Spanish poetry; reading poems from different periods of Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.
  • 351 Introduction to Theater** (4) Explores important aspects of Spanish theater; reading plays from different periods of Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.
  • 436 Contemporary Mexican Literature** [Topic] (4R) Explores major aesthetics trends, genres, authors. Prereq: two from SPAN 316, 317, 318, 319. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
  • 437 Contemporary Latin American Verse** [Topic] (4R) Explores major aesthetic trends, authors, and works in contemporary Latin American poetry. Topics include avant-garde poetry, poetry and subjectivity, poetry and modernism. Prereq: two from SPAN 316, 317, 318, 319. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
  • 450 Colonial Latin American Literature** [Topic] (4R) Representative works of Colonial Latin America. Recent topics include Mestizaje, Colonial Theater, Colonial Literature, Carlos Fuentes. Prereq: two from SPAN 316, 317, 318, 319. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 452 Renaissance and Baroque Poetry** (4) Petrarchism of Garcilaso and Herrera; traditional forms, especially the romance; poetry of Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz, Santa Teresa, Góngora, Lope de Vega, and Quevedo. Prereq: two from SPAN 316, 317, 318, 319.
  • 460 Don Quixote (4) Careful reading of Don Quixote along with discussion of major critical topics and of its place and importance in literary history. Prereq for majors: two from SPAN 316, 317, 318, 319; prereq for nonmajors: equivalent background in literature.
  • 480 19th-Century Spanish American Literature** [Topic] (4R) Topics include issue of literary periods, authors, narrative and nation, genres, and indigenismo. Prereq: two from SPAN 316, 317, 318, 319. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 490 20th-Century Latin American Literature** [Topic] (4R) Explores major literary trends, authors, and works. Recent topics are Avante-garde in the Mexican Revolution, Latin American Theater, Testimonial Literature. Prereq: two from SPAN 316, 317, 318, 319. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

REMINDER: Writing, cultural studies, grammar, film-making, public speaking, speech and rhetoric courses do not count toward this requirement. Students have petitioned the Undergraduate Affairs Committee for exceptions to the list above. The following courses have gone through this petition process and were denied:

  • ARB 353 Arab Cinema
  • CLAS 407 The Archaeology of Pompeii
  • COLT 305 Cultural Studies
  • COLT 350 Topics in Comparative Literature [Topics course; actual course titles vary]
  • COLT 380 Topics in Comparative Media [Topics course; actual course titles vary]. One exception: COLT 380 Surrealist Cinema.
  • FLR 225 Voices of Africa
  • FLR 235 Folklore and the Supernatural
  • FLR 320 Car Cultures
  • FLR 350 Folklore and the Bible
  • HUM 215 Introduction to African Studies
  • HUM 298 Medical Humanities
  • HUM 354/355 The City
  • HUM 361 Ancient Science and Culture

History (8 credits)

All journalism students must complete at least eight history credits. Below are the eligible history courses taken from the 2014-15 UO Catalog. When listed with a >2 or >SSC notation, the course will also meet the university’s Social Science group requirement. Track your progress with your Degree Audit Report on DuckWeb.

Special Studies (199/399) or Experimental (410) courses can only be approved for the history requirement on a case-by-case basis. Verify with your journalism adviser that the course will count toward the requirement before you register for the course.

Honors College (HC)

  •  231, 232, 233 (H) Honors College History (4,4,4) 231, 232: Introduction to methods of historical inquiry and to major historical trends in a global framework; focuses on premodern and modern history. 233: research in history.

History (HIST)

  • 101, 102, 103 Western Civilization (4,4,4) Historical development of the Western world; major changes in value systems, ideas, social structures, economic institutions, and forms of political life. 101: ancient and medieval societies. 102: from the Renaissance to Napoleon. 103: from Napoleon to the present.
  • 104, 105, 106 World History (4,4,4) Survey of world cultures and civilizations and their actions. Includes study of imperialism, economic and social relations. 104: ancient societies. 105: early modern. 106: modern.
  • 120 Foundations of Islamic Civilization (4) Credits Explores the history of the Near East in 600–1500 C.E., from the origins of Islam to the maturation of Islamicate civilization.
  • 121 Women in World History (4) Introduction to the history of women and gender. A comparative survey of women from prehistory to the present.
  • 186 Cultures of India (4) Introduces students to the historical study of culture in the Indian subcontinent.
  • 190 Foundations of East Asian Civilizations (4) Introduction to traditional China and Japan; Confucianism, Buddhism, Daoism; floating worlds; family and gender; traditional views of the body; literati class; samurai; Mongols and Manchus.
  • 191 China, Past and Present (4) Introduction to Chinese culture. Explores meanings of past and present in 20th-century efforts to modernize China. Chronological and topical inquiry into politics, literature, social structure, gender, art, economy.
  • 192 Japan, Past and Present (4) Introduction to Japanese culture. Explores myth, tradition, modernity, and postmodernity with one eye trained on the future. Examples from personal experience.
  • 201, 202, 203 United States (4,4,4) Creation and development of the United States socially, economically, politically, culturally. 201: Native America, European colonization, colonial development, origins of slavery, Revolution, early Republic. 202: Jacksonian era, expansion, commercial and industrial revolution, slavery, Civil War, Reconstruction. 203: imperialism, progressivism, modernity, the 1920s, Depression and New Deal, world wars and cold war, 1960s, and recent developments.
  • 240, 241 War in the Modern World I,II (4,4) Surveys changes in the nature and conduct of warfare in light of social, political, and technological developments. 240: 16th century to 1945. 241: 1945 to present.
  • 245 Russia, America, and the World (4) The United States and Russia share historical experiences that extend far beyond diplomacy, trade, and international adversity or alliance. Includes frontier expansion, revolution, industrialization, imperialism, worldview.
  • 250, 251 African American History (4,4) 250: the African background, development of slavery, abolitionism, the Civil War and Reconstruction. 251: the 20th-century African American experience including the great migration, World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, post-1970 African America.
  • 273 Introduction to American Environmental History (4) Introduction to concepts, concerns, and methods of environmental history, especially in the context of American history to the present.
  • 301, 302, 303 Modern Europe (4,4,4) Political, social, cultural, intellectual, and economic trends from the 18th century to the present. 301: 18th century. 302: 19th century. 303: 20th century.
  • 308, 309 History of Women in the United States I,II (4,4) Survey of the diverse experiences of American women from colonial times to the present. 308: 1600 to 1870. 309: 1870 to present.
  • 319 Early Middle Ages in Europe (4) Emergence, from the remains of the late Roman Empire, of a uniquely medieval Christian culture in the Germanic kingdoms of northern Europe between the 4th and 9th centuries.
  • 320 High Middle Ages in Europe (4) Changes that swept Europe from 1000–1225, including the rise of towns and universities, new spiritual and artistic visions, and varieties of religious and social reform.
  • 321 Late Middle Ages in Europe (4) A survey of Europe, 1250–1430—the age of Dante and the Black Death—when breakthroughs alternated with disasters in the realms of politics, economics, and religion.
  • 322 The Crusades (4) Surveys the idea and practice of Christian holy war—not only in Palestine, but within Europe. From the first crusade in 1096 through early 13th century.
  • 325 Precolonial Africa (4) Survey of African history to the mid-19th century, analyzing processes of state formation, regional and long-distance trade, religion, oral tradition, and systems of slavery.
  • 326 Colonial and Postcolonial Africa (4) Survey of African history from the 1880s to the 1960s. Emphasis on the internal dynamics of change as well as the impact of colonialism.
  • 327 The Age of Discoveries (4) European exploration and seaborne empires, 1270–1600. Motives, technology, and institutions of the Italian and Iberian empires. Medieval travels to Asia; Venetian and Genoese empires; Spanish conquest of Mexico. HIST 101, 102 or equivalents recommended.
  • 332 British History [Topic] (4R) British history from the Celts to the 21st century—economic, political, religious, and social change. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.
  • 336, 337 France (4,4) 336: ancien régime, 1789–1870—French Revolutions of 1789, 1830, and 1848; Napoleonic Empire; monarchy, republicanism, and dictatorship; society and culture in post-Revolutionary France. 337: 1870 to present—the Paris Commune and Third Republic; the Dreyfus affair; popular front, fall of France and Resistance; Algeria, de Gaulle, the 1968 student movement.
  • 342 German History: [Topic] (4R) Middle Ages to the end of the 20th century. I: Middle Ages and Reformation (1410–1648). II: Germany in the Old Regime and Age of Revolution (1648–1848). III: Modern Germany (1848 to present).Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits when topic changes.
  • 345 Early Russia (4) Kievan Rus and Byzantium; Christianization; Mongol dominance; rise of Moscow and two Ivans, one Great, one Terrible; crisis of modernization and subsequent religious dissent.
  • 346 Imperial Russia (4) Siberian and North American expansion; Peter the Great; Catherine the Great; abolition of serfdom; industrialization; Silver Age culture and revolution; World War I and collapse.
  • 347 Soviet Union and Contemporary Russia (4) Examines the rise, development, and collapse of the Soviet Union, the world’s first communist regime. Topics include the Russian Revolution, Stalinism, war, culture, and society.
  • 350, 351 American Radicalism (4,4) Motives, strategies, successes, and failures of radical movements and their significance for American society. 350: American Revolution, slave revolts, abolitionism, women’s rights. 351: workers’ movements, socialism, communism, African American freedom struggle, nationalist movements of people of color, feminism, student activism.
  • 352 The United States in the 1960s (4) Exploration of a watershed era: civil rights, student activism, educational crisis, Vietnam War, gender revolution, environmentalism.
  • 357 The South (4) Regional history of the South and of successive Southern ways of life. Evolution of the South as a slaveholding society, its bid for independence, and its subsequent redefinitions and adaptations to national norms.
  • 358 American Jewish History (4) Ways people who identify themselves as Jews have reinvented their identity and created communities in the United States through the 1990s.
  • 359 Religious Life in the United States (4) Planting, adaptation, development, and social role of religious groups and traditions in the United States from the colonial period to the present.
  • 361 Early Modern Science (4) Explores the subject, practice, and social place of science in the early modern world.
  • 363 American Business History (4) American businesses from their colonial origins to the present. Interaction between the political, social, economic, and ideological environment and the internal structure and activities of business enterprises.
  • 380, 381, 382 Latin America (4,4,4) Major economic, political, and cultural trends and continuities. 380: pre-Columbian and Iberian history, the colonial period up to 1750. 381: transition from late colonial mercantilism to political independence and national definition, 1750–1910. 382: reform and revolution in modern Latin American history, 1910 to the present. Sophomore standing recommended.
  • 385 South Asia [Topic] (4) Introduction to South Asian history in the modern period—South Asia I (1757–1971); South Asia II (1930 to the present). Repeatable once when topic changes for a maximum of 8 credits.
  • 386 India (4) India under British rule, the rise of nationalist politics, and the subcontinent in the years since independence.
  • 387 Early China (4) Survey from the beginnings to the 10th century focuses on the development of Chinese thought and religion and the growth of the imperial state and bureaucracy.
  • 388 Vietnam War and the United States (4) Vietnamese society and history: the First Indochina War, origins and escalation of United States involvement in Vietnam; de-escalation and defeat.
  • 396 Samurai in Film (4) Examination of the image of Japan’s warrior class, the most prominent social group in Japan for over seven centuries. Combines films, readings, and lectures.
  • 412 Ancient Greece [Topic] (4R) Political, cultural, and intellectual history of ancient Greece; emphasis on urban culture. I: Classical Greece. II: Hellenistic World. III: Greek Science. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 414 Ancient Rome [Topic] (4R) Political, social, cultural, and intellectual history of ancient Rome from its foundation to late antiquity; emphasis on urban culture. I: Roman Republic. II: Roman Empire. III: Roman Society. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 415 Advanced World History: [Topic] (4R) Advanced intensive study of selected issues in world history. Possible topics include biology and ecology, ancient empires, or intercultural encounters. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 417 Society and Culture in Modern Africa: [Topic] (4R) Explorations in various topics with attention to class, gender, and generational and political struggles. I: Postcolonial African Film and Politics. II: Colonial Urban Africa. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 419 African Regional Histories [Topic] (4R) Examines the historiography of specific nations or regions; Swahili coast; Tanzania (formerly Tanganyika); urban South Africa, 1870s to 1970s; West African slavery. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits.
  • 420 The Idea of Europe (4) The concept and experience of “Europe” explored creatively throughout history from multiple disciplinary perspectives.
  • 421 Organization of Knowledge (4) Production and preservation of knowledge since ancient times, first libraries, monasteries, and universities; science exploration; books and letters; the academic disciplines; the Internet.
  • 425 Economic History of Modern Europe [Topic] (4R) Industrial revolution, economic transformation, growth, and integration in political and social contexts. Focuses on Britain, France, Germany, and Russia. I: European Economies to 1914. II: European Economies in the 20th Century. Repeatable once when topic changes for maximum of 8 credits.
  • 426 Cultural History of the Enlightenment (4) Developments in science, education, economics, sex, government, art, music, communication, and travel in the 18th-century European Age of Reason.
  • 427 Intellectual History of Modern Europe [Topic] (4R) Major thinkers and movements include classical liberalism, utopian socialism, political economy, Marxism, aestheticism, Nietzsche, classical sociology, psychoanalysis, radical conservatism, Keynesian economics, intellectuals and political engagement, and Western Marxism. I: German Intellectual History. II: Ideas and Society, 19th Century. III: Ideas and Society, 20th Century. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 428 Europe in the 20th Century [Topic] (4R) War, revolution, social change, political transformation, and related intellectual and cultural developments in Europe from the Great War of 1914–18 through the present. I: European Fascism. II: Jews in Modern Europe. III: Eastern Europe since World War I. IV: Europe since 1945. Repeatable when chronological or thematic topic changes.
  • 434 Modern British History [Topic] (4R) Selected topics in modern British history from 1700 to the present. Emphasis varies. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 435 Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (4) The French Revolution; Napoleon; German idealism; British industry; the coalescence of European identity; revolutions in knowledge and education; changing gender roles; imperialism.
  • 437 Medieval Spain (4) A study of two related aspects of medieval Iberian history: Spain as a frontier society and Spain as a multicultural, multireligious society.
  • 438 Golden Age Spain (4) Spanish history during one of the most important eras of its past, when it was a cultural leader in Europe and a major world power.
  • 441 16th-Century European Reformations (4) History of religious, personal, and institutional reforms. Includes late medieval reform movements and the ideas of Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, Ignatius Loyola, and Teresa of Avila.
  • 442 Early Modern German History: [Topic] (4R) Topics include peasant society, the foundations of absolutism, the German Enlightenment, protoindustrialization. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 443 Modern Germany [Topic] (4R) Topics include class formation, revolutionary movements, the socialist tradition, the Third Reich. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 444 The Holocaust (4) Surveys history of Nazi genocide, focusing on terror and complicity in formation of racial policy, and perceptions of Nazi anti-Semitism as the Holocaust was occurring.
  • 445 Tsarist and Imperial Russia [Topic] (4R) Creation of a great Eurasian civilization. Geopolitical expansion, Siberia, imperialism, origins of autocracy, serfdom, church and state, political opposition, rise of civil society, industrialization. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.
  • 446 Modern Russia: [Topic] (4R) Explores topics such as the intellectual and cultural history of Russia from the revolution to recent times. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits.
  • 449 Race and Ethnicity in the American West (4) Explores the growth of communities of color in western cities of the United States, with particular reference to competition and cooperation between groups.
  • 451 American Foreign Relations [Topic] (4R) Chronological and thematic topics in American foreign relations. Repeatable when topic changes.
  • 455 Colonial American History (4) Native Americans; motives, methods, implications of European colonization; origins of American slavery; interaction of diverse peoples in shaping colonial North American societies, economies, landscapes, politics.
  • 456 Revolutionary America (4) Origins, consequences, meanings of American Revolution; changing social, economic, and political contexts; intellectual, religious, and ideological trends; Constitution; institutional, social, and cultural legacy.
  • 457 19th-Century United States [Topic] (4R) Political, social, economic, and cultural history. I: Jacksonian Era. II: Civil War. III: Reconstruction. IV: Gilded Age. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
  • 460 American Intellectual History [Topic] (4R) Leading thinkers and prevalent modes of thought in American life from European settlement of North America to the present. I: To 1800, II: 19th Century, III: 20th Century. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 461 American Medical History (4) Explores the social history of medicine and health in the United States.
  • 463 American Economic History [Topic] (4R) Varying topics on the economic development of the United States as a preindustrial, industrial, and postindustrial society. I: The Great Depression. II: Industrialization. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 466, 467 The American West (4,4) Social, political, and cultural history. 466: peoples of the American West and the expansion of the United States in the 19th century. 467: 20th-century immigration, urban growth, economic development; social and political institutions; politics of race, ethnicity, and gender in a multicultural region.
  • 468 The Pacific Northwest (4) Regional history to the mid-20th century. How the Pacific Northwest mirrors the national experience and how the region has a distinctive history and culture.
  • 469 American Indian History [Topic] (4R) Variable chronological, thematic, and regional topics, including Indian history to 1860; 1860 to the present; Indians and colonialism; Indians and environments; Indians and gender; regional histories. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 473 American Environmental History [Topic] (4R) Variable topics examine the social, cultural, economic, and political history of the American landscape; how Americans have understood, transformed, degraded, conserved, and preserved their environments. I: To 1800. II: 19th Century. III: 20th-Century Environment and Environmentalism. IV: Environment and the West. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
  • 480 Mexico (4) Mexican history from pre-Hispanic times to the present. Special attention to nationhood, economic development, church-state relations, the Mexican identity, and the Revolution of 1910.
  • 482 Latin America’s Indian Peoples (4) Impact of Iberian conquest and settlement on the lives of the indigenous peoples of the Caribbean, Mexico, Central America, and South America.
  • 483 Latin America: [Topic] (4R) Variable topics include the experience of blacks and Indians; the struggle for land, reform, and revolution. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
  • 484 Philippines (4) Philippine history from pre-Hispanic times to the present with particular emphasis on the past hundred years.
  • 487 China [Topic] (4R) Survey from the 10th century. Foundations and transformations of state and society; popular rebellions; impact of imperialism; issues of modernity; state building; political, cultural, and social revolutions. I: Song and Yuan. II: Ming and Qing. III: Late Qing. IV: Republican China. V: China since 1949. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
  • 490 Japan [Topic] (4R) Political, social, and cultural history from ancient through contemporary. Origins, aristocratic society, medieval age, Zen, warrior class, urban growth, modernization, imperialism, Pacific war, postwar society. I: To 1333. II: Medieval, 1333–1800. III: Modern Age. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 491 Medicine and Society in Premodern Japan (4) Japanese medical tradition: folk, Buddhist, Chinese, Dutch. Diseases, treatment and medical services, medical knowledge, acupuncture, sexual hygiene, anatomy, sexually transmitted diseases, reproduction, and family.
  • 497 Culture, Modernity, and Revolution in China [Topic] (4) I: Modernity and Gender. II: Cultural Revolution and Memory. III: Historiography of the Communist Revolution. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
  • 498/598 Early Japanese Culture and Society [Topic] (4R) Aspects of social history through 1800—social change, hierarchy and power, interrelationship of society and religion, medieval transformations, warrior class. I: Buddhism and Society in Medieval Japan. II: Samurai and War. III: Medieval Japan. Courses on Japanese or medieval history recommended. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Economics (8 credits)

All journalism students must complete at least eight economics credits. Below are the eligible economics courses taken from the 2014-15 UO Catalog. When listed with a >2 or SSC notation, the course will also count toward the university’s Social Science group requirement. We usually discourage first-term freshmen from taking EC 201 unless they have a background or interest in the area. Track your progress with your Degree Audit Report on DuckWeb.

Special Studies (199/399) or Experimental (410) courses can only be approved for the economics requirement on a case-by-case basis. Verify with your journalism adviser that the course will count toward the requirement BEFORE you register for the course.Note: This is a complete list of economics courses taught at UO. Most journalism students fulfill this requirement by taking two of EC 101, 201 or 202.

Business (BA)

  • 315 Economy, Industry, and Competitive Analysis (4) Free enterprise capitalism and market competition. Economic value added, product cost, and product pricing. Organizational arrangements and the control of economic activity. Prereq: BA 101.

Note: BA 315 is part of the business minor. Journalism students may use this course toward the economics requirement. However, it will not count toward the 94 College of Arts and Sciences credit requirement.

Economics (EC)

  • 101 Contemporary Economic Issues (4) Examines contemporary public policy using economic principles. Topics may include balanced budgets and tax reform, unemployment, health care, poverty and income redistribution, environmental policy, and international trade policy.
  • 201 Introduction to Economic Analysis: Microeconomics (4) Examines how consumers, firms, and governments make decisions when facing scarce resources and how those decisions affect market outcomes, such as prices and output. MATH 111 recommended.
  • 202 Introduction to Economic Analysis: Macroeconomics (4) Examines the aggregate activity of a market economy, the problems that arise, such as inflation and unemployment, and how the government can use macroeconomic policy to address these problems. EC 201 strongly recommended.
  • 311 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (4) Consumer and firm behavior, market structures. General equilibrium theory, welfare economics, collective choice, rules for evaluating economic policy. Prereq: EC 201, MATH 111. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of EC 311, FIN 311, and FIN 311H.
  • 313 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (4) Determination of aggregate income, employment, and unemployment; evaluation of macroeconomic policies. Prereq: EC 202; EC 311 strongly recommended.
  • 320 Introduction to Econometrics I (4) Application of classical statistical techniques of estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression to economic models. Includes laboratory section in Social Science Instructional Laboratory. Prereq: MATH 242, 243.
  • 327 Introduction to Game Theory (4) Introductory course in game theory. Develops game-theoretic methods of rational decision making and equilibriums, using many in-class active games. Prereq: EC 101 or 201.
  • 330 Urban and Regional Economic Problems (4) Topics may include urban and metropolitan growth, land use, race and poverty, education systems, slums and urban renewal, transportation, crime, and pollution and environmental quality. Prereq: EC 201.
  • 333 Resource and Environmental Economic Issues (4) Economic analysis of replenishable and nonreplenishable natural resources; environmental issues and policies. Prereq: EC 201.
  • 340 Issues in Public Economics (4) Principles and problems of government financing. Expenditures, revenues, debt, and financial administration. Production by government versus production by the private sector. Tax measures to control externalities. Prereq: EC 201.
  • 350 Labor Market Issues (4) Topics may include the changing structure of employment, the minimum wage, the dual labor market hypothesis, collective bargaining, discrimination, and health and safety regulation. Prereq: EC 201.
  • 360 Issues in Industrial Organization (4) Topics may include analysis of market power, trends in industrial structure, the role of advertising, pricing policies and inflation, impact of social regulation (e.g., OSHA, EPA), and international comparisons. Prereq: EC 201.
  • 370 Money and Banking (4) Operations of commercial banks, the Federal Reserve System, and the Treasury that affect the United States monetary system. Prereq: EC 202.
  • 380 International Economic Issues (4) Exchange across international boundaries, theory of comparative advantage, balance of payments and adjustments, international financial movements, exchange rates and international financial institutions, trade restrictions and policy. Prereq: EC 201.
  • 390 Problems and Issues in the Developing Economies (4) Topics may include the role of central planning, capital formation, population growth, agriculture, health and education, interaction between economic and cultural change, and the “North-South debate.” Prereq: EC 201.
  • 411 Advanced Microeconomic Theory (4) Advanced theory of consumer and firm behavior, market structures. Prereq: MATH 253 or 263.
  • 413 Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (4) Advanced theory about the determination of aggregate income, employment, unemployment; evaluation of macroeconomic policies. Prereq: MATH 253 or 263.
  • 418, 419 Economic Analysis of Community Issues I,II (2,4) Hands-on experience applying economic analysis and econometrics to problems that face local community nonprofits and government agencies. Prereq: EC 311, 420.
  • 421 Introduction to Econometrics II (4,4) Application of classical statistical techniques of estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression to economic models. Includes two-hour laboratory section in Social Science Instructional Laboratory. Prereq: MATH 242, 243 or equivalent.
  • 422 Economic Forecasting (4) Basic techniques of economic forecasting that are typically used in a business environment. Prereq: EC 320; coreq: EC 421.
  • 423, 424, 425 Econometrics (4,4,4) Introductory topics in probability theory and statistical inference; regression problems of autocorrelation, heteroskedasticity, multicollinearity, and lagged dependent variables; special single-equation estimating techniques; the identification problem in a simultaneous equation setting; development of simultaneous equation estimating procedures. Prereq for 423: MATH 281, 341; MATH 282 and 461 strongly recommended. Prereq for 424: EC 423. Prereq for 425: EC 424.
  • 427 Games and Decisions (4) Game-theoretic methods of decision-making. Topics may include extensive-form games, noncredible threats, subgame perfect equilibrium, strategic-form games, undominated strategies, Nash equilibrium, coalitional games, and the core. Prereq: MATH 111 or equivalent.
  • 428 Behavioral and Experimental Economics (4) Investigates the “rational choice” model and behavioral alternatives, using laboratory experiments. Topics may include altruism, auctions, bargaining, behavioral finance, hyperbolic discounting, and decision-making under uncertainty. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 430 Urban and Regional Economics (4) Location theory; urbanization and metropolitan growth; regional analysis; intraurban rent, location and land use, size distribution of urban areas; welfare economics, political economy, and urban problems. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 432 Economy of the Pacific Northwest (4) Locational factors influencing development of the region’s major industries; recent changes in income and population; problems and governmental policies in the areas of taxation, environment, and planning. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 433 Resource and Environmental Economics (4) Appropriate time pattern of harvest for a replenishable resource and appropriate rate of exhaustion of a nonreplenishable resource. Issues in natural resource and environmental policies. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 434 Environmental Economics (4) Introduction to the field that includes theoretical environmental policy, issues in environmental regulation, and empirical techniques used by practitioners. Prereq: EC 311, EC 320.
  • 440 Public Economics (4) Theory of public goods and their optimal provision. Collective choice versus private choice and implications for resource allocation and efficiency. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 443 Health Economics (4) Includes moral hazard and adverse selection; incentives faced by health-care providers through reimbursement, managed care, and malpractice; rationale for government intervention in the health-care sector. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 450 Labor Economics (4) Supply and demand for labor, wage determination, minimum wage and worker exploitation, hedonic analysis of risk, human capital investments, labor market signaling and sorting, discrimination, uncertainty, and job matching. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 451 Issues in Labor Economics (4) Topics may include the determination of wages, employment, and unemployment; globalization and immigration; income inequality; internal labor markets; the role of unions; human capital, education, and schools. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 460 Theories of Industrial Organization (4) Theories, quantitative measures, and institutional descriptions of the structure, conduct, and results that characterize American industry. Emphasis is on the determinants and consequences of market power. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 461 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (4) Major policy instruments that have been developed to cope with social problems created by market power. The two principal instruments are antitrust and income policies. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 462 Economics of Transportation (4) Examines economic transportation issues and models, including regulation, demand-cost modeling, productivity analysis, random utility and choice modeling, and spatial economics. Prereq: EC 311; one from EC 320, EC 423.
  • 470 Monetary Policy (4) Federal Reserve System strategies and methods of monetary and credit control. Effects of federal policies on prices, output, and employment. Prereq: EC 313.
  • 471 Monetary Theory (4) Money creation, deficit finance, and taxation in monetary economies. Topics may include the government budget constraint, causes and consequences of inflation, Richardian equivalence, and seigniorage. Prereq: EC 311, 313.
  • 480 International Finance (4) Foreign exchange markets, interaction between spot and forward markets, speculation and interest arbitrage, balance-of-payments accounting, measures of deficits and surpluses, “open-economy” macroeconomic issues. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 481 International Trade (4) Theories of international trade, direction of trade flows, determination of prices and volumes in international trade, tariffs, quotas, customs unions, free versus restricted trade. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 484 Multinational Corporations (4) Economist’s perspective of multinational corporations. Explores the policies governments use to influence corporate behavior and patterns of investment; taxation as a tool for implementing public policy. Prereq: EC 311.
  • 490 Economic Growth and Development (4) Experience of developed countries and theories of development. Analysis of specific development programs, role of agriculture, sources of investment, techniques and strategies of investment planning. Prereq: EC 311, 313.
  • 491 Issues in Economic Growth and Development (4) Economic issues in developing countries, including use of central planning or markets, capital formation, agriculture, population growth, health and education systems, and the “North-South debate.” Prereq: EC 311, 313.
  • 493 The Evolution of Economic Ideas (4) Economic thought from the ancient world to the 20th century. Major schools of economic thought and their relationship to other social ideas of their times. Prereq: EC 311, 313.

Additional Block 1 (8 credits)

In addition to the literature, history and economics block requirements, all journalism students must complete three additional blocks. Each block consists of eight credits of a subject offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. Eligible subjects are: AEIS, AFR, ANTH, ARB, ASIA, ASL, ASTR, BI, CAS, CH, CHN, CINE, CIS, CIT, CLAS, COLT, CRWR, DANE, EALL, EC, ENG, ENVS, ES, EURO, FINN, FLR, FR, GEOG, GEOL, GER, GRK, HBRW, HC, HIST, HPHY, HUM, INTL, ITAL, JDST, JPN, KRN, LAS, LAT, LING, LT, MATH, MDVL, NORW, PHIL, PHYS, PORT, PS, PSY, REES, REL, RL, RUSS, SCAN,  SOC, SPAN, SWAH, SWED, TA, WGS, WR.

The Additional Blocks CAN overlap with the following requirements:

  • Classes taken to fulfill the university’s Arts & Letters (>1), Social Science (>2) and Science (>3) group requirements (unless the class is also being used for SOJC requirements in literature, history or economics.)
  • Classes taken toward the UO Bachelor of Science requirement.
  • Minor and second major coursework in the College of Arts and Sciences.
  • Electives in the College of Arts and Sciences.

The Additional Blocks CANNOT overlap with:

  • First- and second-year foreign language (if used for the Bachelor of Arts degree)
  • Writing Composition (WR) classes used for the UO writing requirement.
  • Courses used for the literature, history or economics requirements in the SOJC.

This requirement and the potential for overlap with other requirements can be very complicated and highly individualized. Please speak with your SOJC Academic Advisor to learn about your options.

Additional Block 2 (8 credits)

In addition to the literature, history and economics block requirements, all journalism students must complete three additional blocks. Each block consists of eight credits of a subject offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. Eligible subjects are: AEIS, AFR, ANTH, ARB, ASIA, ASL, ASTR, BI, CAS, CH, CHN, CINE, CIS, CIT, CLAS, COLT, CRWR, DANE, EALL, EC, ENG, ENVS, ES, EURO, FINN, FLR, FR, GEOG, GEOL, GER, GRK, HBRW, HC, HIST, HPHY, HUM, INTL, ITAL, JDST, JPN, KRN, LAS, LAT, LING, LT, MATH, MDVL, NORW, PHIL, PHYS, PORT, PS, PSY, REES, REL, RL, RUSS, SCAN,  SOC, SPAN, SWAH, SWED, TA, WGS, WR.

The Additional Blocks CAN overlap with the following requirements:

  • Classes taken to fulfill the university’s Arts & Letters (>1), Social Science (>2) and Science (>3) group requirements (unless the class is also being used for SOJC requirements in literature, history or economics.)
  • Classes taken toward the UO Bachelor of Science requirement.
  • Minor and second major coursework in the College of Arts and Sciences.
  • Electives in the College of Arts and Sciences.

The Additional Blocks CANNOT overlap with:

  • First- and second-year foreign language (if used for the Bachelor of Arts degree)
  • Writing Composition (WR) classes used for the UO writing requirement.
  • Courses used for the literature, history or economics requirements in the SOJC.

This requirement and the potential for overlap with other requirements can be very complicated and highly individualized. Please speak with your SOJC Academic Advisor to learn about your options.

Additional Block 3 (8 credits)

In addition to the literature, history and economics block requirements, all journalism students must complete three additional blocks. Each block consists of eight credits of a subject offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. Eligible subjects are: AEIS, AFR, ANTH, ARB, ASIA, ASL, ASTR, BI, CAS, CH, CHN, CINE, CIS, CIT, CLAS, COLT, CRWR, DANE, EALL, EC, ENG, ENVS, ES, EURO, FINN, FLR, FR, GEOG, GEOL, GER, GRK, HBRW, HC, HIST, HPHY, HUM, INTL, ITAL, JDST, JPN, KRN, LAS, LAT, LING, LT, MATH, MDVL, NORW, PHIL, PHYS, PORT, PS, PSY, REES, REL, RL, RUSS, SCAN,  SOC, SPAN, SWAH, SWED, TA, WGS, WR.

The Additional Blocks CAN overlap with the following requirements:

  • Classes taken to fulfill the university’s Arts & Letters (>1), Social Science (>2) and Science (>3) group requirements (unless the class is also being used for SOJC requirements in literature, history or economics.)
  • Classes taken toward the UO Bachelor of Science requirement.
  • Minor and second major coursework in the College of Arts and Sciences.
  • Electives in the College of Arts and Sciences.

The Additional Blocks CANNOT overlap with:

  • First- and second-year foreign language (if used for the Bachelor of Arts degree)
  • Writing Composition (WR) classes used for the UO writing requirement.
  • Courses used for the literature, history or economics requirements in the SOJC.

This requirement and the potential for overlap with other requirements can be very complicated and highly individualized. Please speak with your SOJC Academic Advisor to learn about your options.

Courses used to satisfy the block requirements must come from the CAS departments listed below. Courses taken from CAS departments to satisfy university general-education requirements may simultaneously count toward the 56-credit block requirement with the following exceptions:

  • WR 121, 122 and 123, and first- and second-year foreign language courses used to satisfy the Bachelor of Arts requirement may not be used to satisfy the 56-credit block requirement. (However, these courses do count toward the total 94 CAS credits required.)
  • Courses numbered 199, 200, 400-406 or 408-410 may not be used to fill the 56-credit block requirement except by petition to the school’s Undergraduate Affairs Committee.

Students in the Robert D. Clark Honors College and students whose first language is not English should talk to their journalism adviser about applying HC and/or AEIS courses toward the CAS and block requirements.

Watch out…
Students who take courses in business, accounting, finance, marketing, management, art history, art, architecture, photography, music, dance or education should know that these courses are not part of the College of Arts and Sciences and cannot count toward the block requirement. If you are pursuing a double major or minor in any of these areas (or switched to journalism from one of these majors), work closely with your adviser to make sure your block requirements are not neglected. Current UO College of Arts and Sciences course prefixes/subject codes:

AEIS*  American English for International Students
AFR  African Studies
ANAT  Anatomy
ANTH  Anthropology
ARB  Arabic
ASIA  Asian Studies
ASL*  American Sign Language
ASTR  Astronomy
BI  Biology
CAS  College of Arts and Sciences
CH  Chemistry
CHN  Chinese
CINE  Cinema Studies
CIS  Computer and Information Science
CIT  Computer Information Technology
CLAS  Classics
COLT  Comparative Literature
CRWR  Creative Writing
CSCH  College Scholars
DANE  Danish
EALL  East Asian Languages and Literature
EC  Economics
ENG  English
ENVS  Environmental Studies
ES  Ethnic Studies
EURO  European Studies
FINN  Finnish
FLR  Folklore
FR  French
GEOG  Geography
GEOL  Geology
GER  German
GRK  Greek
GS  General Science
GSS  General Social Science
HBRW  Hebrew
HC*  Honors College
HIST  History
HPHY  Human Physiology
HUM  Humanities
INTL  International Studies
ITAL  Italian
JDST  Judaic Studies
JPN  Japanese
KRN  Korean
LAS  Latin American Studies
LAT  Latin
LING  Linguistics
LT  Language Training
MATH  Mathematics
MDVL  Medieval Studies
NORW  Norwegian
PHIL  Philosophy
PHYS  Physics
PORT  Portuguese
PS  Political Science
PSY  Psychology
REES  Russian and East European Studies
REL Religious Studies
RL  Romance Languages
RUSS  Russian
SCAN  Scandinavian
SCS  Society of College Scholars
SOC  Sociology
SPAN  Spanish
SWAH  Swahili
SWED  Swedish
TA  Theater Arts
WGS  Women’s and Gender Studies
WR  Writing

* Although not officially part of the College of Arts and Sciences, AEIS, ASL and HC courses count toward the 94-credit CAS requirement.